Skip to main content
Flag of Singapore


Republic of Singapore East and Southeast Asia Singapore 5,567,301 inhabitants 697 sq km 7,987.52 inhabitants/sq km Singapore dollars (SGD) population evolution

Top tourist attractions in Singapore

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Singapore. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Singapore section.

Curious if any of these place from Singapore made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Singapore and other countries on our tourist attractions map.

Universal Studios Singapore

Amusement Park

Universal Studios Singapore is a theme park located within Resorts World Sentosa on Sentosa Island, Singapore. It was a key component of Genting's bid for the right to build Singapore's second integrated resort. On 8 December 2006, the Singapore government announced that the consortium had won the bid. Construction of the theme park and the rest of the resort started on 19 April 2007. It is the second Universal Studios theme park to open in Asia, and the first in Southeast Asia. The official plans for the park were unveiled to the public when Universal Studios Singapore released a park map to the public on 20 October 2009. Universal Studios Singapore has since attracted more than 2 million visitors in the 9 months from its opening. Universal Parks & Resorts markets the park as a "one-of-its-kind theme park in Asia" and promises that the park will be the only one of its kind in Southeast Asia for the next 30 years.


Tourist attraction

Sentosa is a popular island resort in Singapore, visited by some five million people a year. Attractions include a 2 km long sheltered beach, Fort Siloso, two golf courses, two five-star hotels, and the Resorts World Sentosa, featuring the theme park Universal Studios Singapore.

Singapore Zoo


The Singapore Zoo, formerly known as the Singapore Zoological Gardens and commonly known locally as the Mandai Zoo, occupies 28 hectares on the margins of Upper Seletar Reservoir within Singapore's heavily forested central catchment area. The zoo was built at a cost of S$9m granted by the government of Singapore and opened on 27 June 1973. It is operated by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, who also manage the neighbouring Night Safari and the Jurong BirdPark. There are about 315 species of animal in the zoo, of which some 16% are considered threatened species. The zoo attracts about 1.6 million visitors each year. From the beginning, Singapore Zoo followed the modern trend of displaying animals in naturalistic, 'open' exhibits with hidden barriers, moats, and glass between the animals and visitors. It houses the largest captive colony of orangutans in the world. In 1977, primatologist Dr Francine Neago lived inside a cage with eighteen orangutans for six months to study their behavior and communication.

Jurong BirdPark


Jurong Bird Park, is a tourist attraction in Singapore managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore. It is a landscaped park, built on the western slope of Jurong Hill. It is located within the Boon Lay Planning Area of the Jurong district and has an area of 202,000 square metres.

Singapore Flyer

Tourist attraction

The Singapore Flyer is a giant Ferris wheel in Singapore that was constructed between 2005 and 2008. Described by its operators as an observation wheel, it reaches 42 storeys high, with a total height of 165 m, making it the tallest Ferris wheel in the world, 5 m taller than the Star of Nanchang and 30 m taller than the London Eye. Situated on the southeast tip of the Marina Centre reclaimed land, it comprises a 150 m diameter wheel, built over a three-storey terminal building which houses shops, bars and restaurants, and offers broad views of the city centre and beyond to about 45 km, including the Indonesian islands of Batam and Bintan, as well as Johor, Malaysia. The final capsule was installed on 2 October 2007, the wheel started rotating on 11 February 2008 and it officially opened to the public on 1 March 2008. Tickets for rides on the first 3 nights were sold out for S$8,888, an auspicious number in Chinese culture. The grand opening for the Flyer was held on 15 April 2008. Each of the 28 air-conditioned capsules is capable of holding 28 passengers, and a complete rotation of the wheel takes about 30 minutes. Initially rotating in a counter-clockwise direction when viewed from Marina Centre, its direction was changed on 4 August 2008 under the advice of Feng shui masters.

Singapore Botanic Gardens

Tourist attraction

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is a 74-hectare botanical garden in Singapore. It is the only botanic garden in the world that opens from 5 a.m. to 12 midnight every single day of the year, and does not charge an admission fee, except for the National Orchid Garden. The garden is bordered by Holland Road and Napier Road to the south, Cluny Road to the east, Tyersall Avenue and Cluny Park Road to the west and Bukit Timah Road to the North. The linear distance between the northern and southern ends is around 2.5 km. In December 2012, an application for it to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site was made.

Underwater World, Singapore


Underwater World, also known as Underwater World Singapore Pte Ltd, is an oceanarium located on the offshore Singaporean island of Sentosa. Opened in 1991, it has more than 2,500 marine animals of 250 species from different regions of the world. The oceanarium is mostly underground and it is owned by the Haw Par Corporation. The Underwater World's ticket includes admission to the Dolphin Lagoon at Palawan Beach. Underwater World is also involved in several environmental and educational projects, such as the Living in the Ocean Programme, Ocean Ambassador Programme and the Coral Club. The Underwater World also provides exclusive venues to host events, such as ocean-themed functions.

Night Safari, Singapore


The Night Safari is the world's first nocturnal zoo and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Singapore. The concept of a nocturnal park in Singapore was suggested in the 1980s by the former executive chairman of the Singapore Zoo, Dr Ong Swee Law. Constructed at a cost of S$63 million, the Night Safari was officially opened on 26 May 1994 and occupies 40 hectares of secondary rainforest adjacent to the Singapore Zoo and Upper Seletar Reservoir. The Night Safari currently houses 1,040 animals representing 120 species, of which 29% are threatened species. The zoo is managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, and about 1.1 million visitors visit the safari per year. The Night Safari received its 11 millionth visitor on 29 May 2007.

Science Centre Singapore


The Science Centre Singapore, previously known as Singapore Science Centre is a scientific institution in Jurong East, Singapore, specialising in the promotion of scientific and technological education for the general public. With over 850 exhibits spread over eight exhibition galleries, it sees over a million visitors a year today, and over 17 million visitors up to the year 2003 when it celebrated its silver jubilee.

Sri Mariamman Temple, Singapore

Hindu temple

The Sri Mariamman Temple is Singapore's oldest Hindu temple. It is an agamic temple, built in the Dravidian style. Located at 244 South Bridge Road, in the downtown Chinatown district, the temple serves mainly Hindu Singaporeans in the city-state. Due to its architectural and historical significance, the temple has been gazetted a National Monument and is a major tourist attraction. Sri Mariamman Temple is managed by the Hindu Endowments Board, a statutory board under the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports. The Sri Mariamman Temple was founded in 1827 by Naraina Pillai, eight years after the East India Company established a trading settlement in Singapore. Pillai was a government clerk from Penang who arrived in Singapore with Sir Stamford Raffles on his second visit to the island in May 1819. Pillai went on to set up the island's first construction company, and also entered the textile trade. He rapidly established himself in business and was identified as a leader of the Indian community.

Telok Ayer Market

Protected Site

Telok Ayer Market, also known colloquially as Lau Pa Sat, is a historic building in Singapore, and is located in Downtown Core within the Central Area, Singapore's central business district. It is currently a food centre. There are several shops inside the market such as a 24 hours Cheers Store, a shoe repair shop, a tailor and a laundry store. In the evenings on the weekend a live band plays at the stage in the middle of the market.

Escape Theme Park

Amusement Park

Escape Theme Park was an outdoor theme park located inside NTUC Downtown East, Pasir Ris in Singapore. It was opened in May 2000 and a water park named Wild Wild Wet located adjacent to it was opened in June 2004. Its slogan is "360 degrees of fun". The theme park operates on Saturdays, Sundays, gazetted school and public holidays. It had been a non-smoking park from 2005 until it ceased operations in November 2011 for redevelopment. In 2012, reports confirmed that the park would make way for an expansion of Wild Wild Wet

Armenian Church, Singapore

Place of worship

The Armenian Church is the oldest Christian church in Singapore, located at Hill Street in the Museum Planning Area, within the Central Area, Singapore's central business district.

Peranakan Museum


The Peranakan Museum is a museum in Singapore specialising in Peranakan culture. A sister museum to the Asian Civilizations Museum, it is the first of its kind in the world, that explore Peranakan cultures in Singapore and other former Straits Settlements in Malacca and Penang, and other Peranakan communities in Southeast Asia. It is housed in the Old Tao Nan School building at Armenian Street, which served as an extended wing to the artefact collection of Asian Civilisations Museum. On January 1, 2006 the Museum, known then as ACM 1 closed the Armenian Street wing for a major revamp. At its closure, the museum management chose Peranakan culture theme over a children's museum and a Chinese ceramic museum as their new showcase in the Tao Nan School space. This enabled the Museum to house the world's most distinctive and comprehensive Peranakan museum collection of artifacts and wares, with a potential annual visitorship numbers of 112,000 people. Also, the revamp enabled 25 per cent more exhibition space for contextual displays for different aspects of Peranakan home and lifestyle. It also includes plans for Peranakan-themed eateries and shops in the row of four shop-houses adjacent to its building.

Old Ford Motor Factory


The Old Ford Motor Factory is a historic building in Singapore, located along Upper Bukit Timah Road.

Sun Yat Sen Nanyang Memorial Hall


The Sun Yat Sen Nanyang Memorial Hall, also known as Wan Qing Yuan, and formerly as Sun Yat Sen Villa, is a two-storey colonial style villa in Balestier, Singapore. The villa is now a museum commemorating Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of the Republic of China, who visited Singapore nine times between 1900 and 1911. Located at 12 Tai Gin Road in Balestier, the villa occupies an area of approximately 3,120 square metres and played a crucial role in the 1911 Xinhai Revolution by serving as the Tongmenghui's base in Nanyang in the early 20th century.

Bras Basah MRT Station

Transit Stop

Bras Basah MRT Station is an underground Mass Rapid Transit station on the Circle Line in the Museum Planning Area of Singapore. This station opened on 17 April 2010.

Malay Heritage Centre


The Malay Heritage Centre is a cultural centre in Singapore to showcase the heritage, culture and history of Malay Singaporeans. Located at Sultan Gate of Kampong Glam, the 8,000 square metre centre was launched on 27 November 2004. The building was once the Istana Kampong Glam and Gedung Kuning, and was part of a larger original compound that led to the Beach Road frontage. Sultan Gate has been known as such since the 1950s. The Malay Heritage Foundation, formed in 28 July 1999, embarked on a major restoration project of the Istana Kampong Glam in 1999. Completed in 2004, it reopened as the Malay Heritage Centre. On the grounds of the Malay Heritage Centre are Gelam trees, the replica of a Bugis prahu or boat; the Pinisi, and information markers on the history of the Bugis people and their trade. The centre houses the Malay Heritage Museum, which preserves and showcase the Malay culture and heritage in Singapore, through historic artefacts, multimedia and diorama displays, and exhibits. The centre also organizes Malay cultural programmes and workshops, and together with fund-raising activities contribute to two-thirds of its operational costs. In 2008, the Singapore Government announced their move to provide full S$1.7 million a year funding, to the Heritage Centre, from the one-third funding provided to them in the previous years. The funding and aid from the National Heritage Board will boost the centre to become a museum of international standard, and allow opportunities to work with other top regional museums in Indonesia and Malaysia.

Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery

Buddhist Place of Worship

The Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery, is located at 88 Bright Hill Road at Bishan. It is the largest Buddhist temple in Singapore.

Singapore Discovery Centre


The S'pore Discovery Centre is a 'edutainment' attraction that offers engaging exhibits for everybody, providing insights into what makes Singapore tick.

Sri Mahamariamman Temple, Penang

Tourist attraction

Built in 1833, the Arulmigu Sri Mahamariamman Temple is the oldest Hindu temple in Penang, Malaysia, and features fascinating sculptures of gods and goddesses over its main entrance and facade. It is located at Lebuh Queen . It is also known as Mariamman Temple or Queen Street Indian Temple. Throughout the years, the Sri Mahamariamman temple has also been known by several names: Sri Muthu Mariamman Temple, Sri Arulmigu Mahamariamman Temple, Sri Mariamman Temple. All these names refer to the same temple. The temple is open daily from 6.30 am - 12.00 noon and 4.30 pm - 9.00 pm. It became a place of worship as early as 1801 and became a temple on 1833. It has stood at the same place for more than 200 years.

Changi Museum


The Changi Museum is a museum dedicated to Singapore's history during the Second World War. In 1988, Singapore built a replica Chapel and Museum next to the Changi Prison. When Changi Prison was expanded in 2001, the Chapel and Museum was relocated to a new site 1 km away and the Changi Chapel and Museum was officially established on 15 February 2001. Bernard Stogden, the son of Sgt. Harry Stogden, was invited to place the cross that his father made onto the wreathed altar in the new Chapel. He was claimed to have cried while doing so, as this was one of the only chances he got to interact with his father as "Harry" Stogden died during the war. The Museum has a collection of paintings, photographs and personal effects donated by former POWs. Among the collection is a series of paintings and sketches by a POW named William Haxworth which provide valuable insight on the daily life of the internees during the occupation. In 1986, Haxworth's wife donated a collection of over 400 paintings and sketches to the National Archives of Singapore. Also in the museum is a collection of watercolour paintings by Mary Angela Bateman who was among the thousands of women and children held at Changi Prison for more than three years during the war.