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Oman

Sultanate of Oman Middle East Muscat 3,219,775 inhabitants 309,500 sq km 10.40 inhabitants/sq km Omani rials (OMR) population evolution

Top tourist attractions in Oman

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Oman. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Oman section.

Curious if any of these place from Oman made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Oman and other countries on our tourist attractions map.

Jebel Akhdar

Mountain range

The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar, is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams, is around 3,000 metres high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km from Muscat. The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name. Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam. Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque

Islamic Structure

The Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque is the main Mosque in the Sultanate of Oman.

Bahla Fort

Tourist attraction

Bahla Fort is one of four historic fortresses situated at the foot of the Djebel Akhdar highlands in Oman. It was built in the 13th and 14th centuries, when the oasis of Bahla was prosperous under the control of the Banu Nebhan tribe. The fort's ruined adobe walls and towers rise some 165 feet above its sandstone foundations. Nearby to the southwest is the Friday Mosque with a 14th-century sculpted mihrab. The fort was not restored or conserved before 1987, and had fallen into a parlous state, with parts of the walls collapsing each year in the rainy season. The fort became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. It was included in the List of World Heritage in Danger from 1988. Restoration works began in the 1990s, and nearly $9m were spent by the Omani government from 1993 to 1999. It remained covered with scaffolding and closed to tourists for many years. It was removed from the list of endangered sites in 2004. The reviewed and updated Management Plan 2009/2010 by UNESCO is adopted and undergoing until now 2013. The fort of Bahla has been semi-reopened to the public in September 2012. The Fort at Bahla, together with the nearby forts at Izki and Nizwa, and one further north at Rustaq, were centres of Kharajite resistance to the "normalization" of Caliph Harun al-Rashid. The town of Bahla, including the oasis, suq and palm grove, is itself surrounded by adobe walls some 12 km long, the wall of the fortress is the third largest in the world. The town is well known for its pottery and its magic, in fact its second name is "Madinat Al Sehr".

Nizwa Fort

Tourist attraction

The Nizwa Fort is a massive castle in Nizwa, Oman. It was built in the 1650s by the second Ya’rubi Imam; Imam Sultan Bin Saif Al Ya'rubi, although its underlying structure goes back to the 12th Century. It is Oman's most visited national monument. The fort was the administrative seat of authority for the presiding Imams and Walis in times of peace and conflict. The main bulk of the fort took about 12 years to complete and was built above an underground stream. The fort is a powerful reminder of the town's significance through turbulent periods in Oman's long history. It was a formidable stronghold against raiding forces that desired Nizwa's abundant natural wealth and its strategic location at the crossroads of vital routes. The fort's design reflects the Omani architectural ingenuity in the Ya’rubi era that witnessed considerable advancement in military fortifications and the introduction of mortar-based warfare. The main part of the fort is its enormous drum-like tower that rises 30 metres above the ground and has a diameter of 36 metres. The strong foundations of the fort go 30 metres into the ground, and a portion of the tower is filled with rocks, dirt and rubble. The doors are inches deep and the walls are rounded and robust, designed to withstand fierce barrages of mortar fire. There are 24 openings all around the top of the tower for mortar fire.

Wadi Dhaiqah

Tourist attraction

Wadi Dhaiqah is a wadi, or dry river bed, in a canyon about 90 kilometers east of the Bait Hattat roundabout in Muscat, Oman. As many as 120 other wadis lead to this valley, which contains a natural park extending from Wilayat Dima W'attayyeen in the Sharqiyah region to the Wilayat of Qurayyat in the Governorate of Muscat. Wadi Dhaiqah contains the fruit farms of Al Mazarea, and has been the focus of Omani government plans for a major irrigation project.

Muscat Gate Museum

Museum

The Muscat Gate Museum is a museum, located on Al Saidiya Street, Muscat, Oman. Opened in January 2001, the museum contains displays about Oman's history from the Neolithic times to the present. It has a number of special exhibits on Muscat's water springs, the ancient wells, underground channels, the souks, houses, mosques, harbors and forts.