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Morocco

Kingdom of Morocco Africa Rabat 32,987,206 inhabitants 446,550 sq km 73.87 inhabitants/sq km Moroccan dirhams (MAD) population evolution

Top tourist attractions in Morocco

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Morocco. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Morocco section.

Curious if any of these place from Morocco made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Morocco and other countries on our tourist attractions map.

Rif

Mountain range

The Rif or Riff is a mainly mountainous region of northern Morocco, with some fertile plains, stretching from Cape Spartel and Tangier in the west to Ras Kebdana and the Melwiyya River in the east, and from the Mediterranean in the north to the river of Wergha in the south. The region's name comes from the Berber word Arif.

Hassan II Mosque

Moorish Structure

The Hassan II Mosque or Grande Mosquée Hassan II is a mosque in Casablanca, Morocco. It is the largest mosque in the country and the 7th largest in the world. Its minaret is the world's tallest at 210 metres (689 ft). Completed in 1993, it was designed by Michel Pinseau and built by Bouygues. The minaret is 60 stories high topped by a laser, the light from which is directed towards Mecca. The mosque stands on a promontory looking out to the Atlantic Ocean, the sea bed being visible through the glass floor of the building's hall. The walls are of hand-crafted marble and the roof is retractable. A maximum of 105,000 worshippers can gather together for prayer: 25,000 inside the mosque hall and another 80,000 on the mosque's outside grounds.

Menara gardens

Tourist attraction

The Menara gardens are gardens located to the west of Marrakech, Morocco, at the gates of the Atlas mountains. They were built in the 12th century by the Almohad ruler Abd al-Mu'min. The name menara derives from the pavillon with its small green pyramid roof. The pavilion was built during the 16th century Saadi dynasty and renovated in 1869 by sultan Abderrahmane of Morocco, who used to stay here in summertime.

Jemaa el-Fnaa

Tourist attraction

Jamaa el Fna is a square and market place in Marrakesh's medina quarter. It remains the main square of Marrakesh, used by locals and tourists.

Koutoubia Mosque

Islamic Place of Worship

The Koutoubia Mosque or Kutubiyya Mosque is the largest mosque in Marrakech, Morocco. The mosque is also known by several other names, such as Jami' al-Kutubiyah, Kotoubia Mosque, Kutubiya Mosque, Kutubiyyin Mosque, and Mosque of the Booksellers. It is located in the southwest medina quarter of Marrakech. The mosque is ornamented with curved windows, a band of ceramic inlay, pointed merlons, and decorative arches; it has a large plaza with gardens, and is floodlit at night. The minaret, 77 metres in height, includes a spire and orbs. It was completed under the reign of the Almohad Caliph Yaqub al-Mansur, and has inspired other buildings such as the Giralda of Seville and the Hassan Tower of Rabat.

Majorelle Garden

Tourist attraction

The Majorelle Garden is a twelve-acre botanical garden and artist's landscape garden in Marrakech, Morocco. It was designed by the expatriate French artist Jacques Majorelle in the 1920s and 1930s, during the colonial period when Morocco was a protectorate of France.

Chellah

Tourist attraction

Chellah, or Sala Colonia is a necropolis and complex of ancient Roman Mauretania Tingitana and medieval ruins at the outskirts of Rabat, Morocco. First spot of Salé, this latter was completed towards the north of the river. It is the most ancient human settlement on the mouth of the Bou Regreg River.

Hassan Tower

Tourist attraction

Hassan Tower or Tour Hassan is the minaret of an incomplete mosque in Rabat, Morocco. Begun in 1195, the tower was intended to be the largest minaret in the world along with the mosque, also intended to be the world's largest. In 1199, Sultan Yacoub al-Mansour died and construction on the mosque stopped. The tower reached 44 m, about half of its intended 86 m height. The rest of the mosque was also left incomplete, with only the beginnings of several walls and 200 columns being constructed. The tower, made of red sandstone, along with the remains of the mosque and the modern Mausoleum of Mohammed V, forms an important historical and tourist complex in Rabat. Instead of stairs, the tower is ascended by ramps. The minaret's ramps would have allowed the muezzin to ride a horse to the top of the tower to issue the call to prayer.

El Badi Palace

Tourist attraction

El Badi Palace is located in Marrakech, Morocco, and these days it consists of the remnants of a palace commissioned by the Saadian Sultan Ahmad al-Mansur in 1578. The building of the palace was financed by a ransom paid by Portugal after the Battle of Three Kings. The original building is thought to have consisted of 360 rooms, a courtyard of 135 m by 110 m and a pool of 90 m by 20 m, richly decorated with Italian marble and large amounts of gold imported from Sudan. It also has a small, underground, tunnel-like jail with about four cells where the king kept his prisoners. The palace, which took approximately 25 years to construct, was torn apart in the seventeenth century by the Alaouite Sultan Moulay Ismail, who used the material obtained from El Badi Palace to decorate his own palace in Meknes. The design of the palace was influenced by the Alhambra in Granada. In one of the refurbished pavilions, the Koutoubia minbar is now on exhibition. There is extensive restoration work ongoing at the palace including rebuilding the walls and restoring the pools.

Souss-Massa National Park

Tourist attraction

The Souss-Massa National Park is a 33,800 hectare national park on the Atlantic coast of Morocco which was created in 1991. It lies between Agadir to the north and Sidi Ifni to the south and its centre is at 9°40'W 30°5'N. The estuary of the Oued Souss is the northern limit of the park, and that of the Oued Massa is near the southern end. 30,000 ha of land near Aglou, south of the park, is also included in the site because it is sometimes used as a feeding area by the Northern Bald Ibis. The habitat is grazed steppe with dunes, beaches and wetlands. The soil is mainly sandy with some rockier areas.

Bahia Palace

Tourist attraction

The Bahia Palace is a palace and a set of gardens located in Marrakech, Morocco. It was built in the late 19th century, intended to be the greatest palace of its time. The name means "brilliance". As in other buildings of the period in other countries, it was intended to capture the essence of the Islamic and Moroccan style. There is a 2 acre garden with rooms opening onto courtyards. Set up at the end of 19th century by Si Moussa, grand vizier of the sultan, for his personal use, this palace would bear the name of one of his wives. Here, the harem, which includes a vast court decorated with a central basin and surrounded by rooms intended for the concubines. As the black slave Abu Ahmed rose to power and wealth towards the end of the 19th century, he had the Bahia palace built by bringing in craftsmen from Fez.

Kasbah of the Udayas

Tourist attraction

The Kasbah of the Udayas is a kasbah in Rabat, Morocco at the mouth of the Bou Regreg river opposite Salé. It was built during the reign of the Almohads. When the Almohads had captured Rabat and destroyed the kasbah of the Almoravids in the town, they began reconstructing it in AH 544 / AD 1150. They added a palace and a mosque and named it al-Mahdiyya, after their ancestor al-Mahdi Ibn Tumart. After the death of Yaqub al-Mansur the kasbah was deserted.

Mausoleum of Mohammed V

Tourist attraction

The Mausoleum of Mohammed V is a historical building located on the opposite side of the Hassan Tower on the Yacoub al-Mansour esplanade in Rabat, Morocco. It contains the tombs of the Moroccan king and his two sons, late King Hassan II and Prince Abdallah. The building is considered a masterpiece of modern Alaouite dynasty architecture, with its white silhouette, topped by a typical green tiled roof, green being the color of Islam. A reader of the Koran is often present, having his assigned seat. Its construction was completed in 1971. Hassan II was buried there following his death in 1999.

Casablanca Twin Center

Building complex

The Casablanca Twin Center is a complex of two skyscrapers located at Casablanca, Morocco. The two structures, the West Tower and the East Tower, have 28 floors each. The centre houses a complex of shops, offices, and a 5 star hotel, and lies at the heart of Casablanca in the Maarif district, at the crossroads between Zerktouni Boulevard and the Boulevard Al Massira Al Khadra. The architect was the Spanish Catalan Ricardo Bofill Levi.

Casablanca Cathedral

Tourist attraction

Casablanca Cathedral, church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, is a former Roman Catholic church located in Casablanca, Morocco. It was built in 1930. It ceased its religious function in 1956, after the independence of Morocco, and became a cultural centre which is open to visitors. The church was designed by French architect Paul Tournon, using the Neo-Gothic style. It is commonly referred to as a cathedral although in reality it never was one as it was never the seat of a bishop.

American Legation, Tangier

Museum

The Tangier American Legation is a building in the medina of Tangier, Morocco. The first American public property outside of the United States, it commemorates the historic cultural and diplomatic relations between the United States and the Kingdom of Morocco. It is now officially called the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies, and is a cultural center, museum, and a research library, concentrating on Arabic language studies. The legation was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on January 8, 1981. U.S. Secretary of the Interior James G. Watt subsequently designated it a National Historic Landmark on December 17, 1982. It was the first such listing or designation in a foreign country. The building has been listed on the U.S. Secretary of State's Register of Culturally Significant Property, a listing of State Department properties around the world that have particular cultural or historical significance.

Ifrane National Park

Protected Site

Ifrane National Park is a national park in the Moyen Atlas mountain range, in Morocco. It covers an area of 500 km2. Much of the park is forested with Atlas cedar. Ifrane National Park is one of the few remaining habitats for the Barbary Macaque, Macaca sylvanus; this primate prehistorically had a much broader range in North Africa, but currently survives as an endangered species in narrowly restricted and fragmented habitats.