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Top tourist attractions in Japan

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Japan. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Japan section.

Curious if any of these place from Japan made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Japan and other countries on our tourist attractions map.

Mount Fuji


Mount Fuji, located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m. An active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–08, Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers. It is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku; it is a Special Place of Scenic Beauty, a Historic Site, and was added to the World Heritage List as a Cultural Site on June 22nd, 2013. The mountain has been selected as a “cultural” rather than a “natural” heritage site. As per UNESCO, Mount Fuji has “inspired artists and poets and been the object of pilgrimage for centuries”. The 25 locations include the mountain itself, Fujisan Hongū Sengen Taisha and six other Sengen shrines, two lodging houses, Lake Yamanaka, Lake Kawaguchi, the eight Oshino Hakkai hot springs, two lava tree molds, the remains of the Fuji-kō cult in the Hitoana cave, Shiraito Falls, and Miho no Matsubara pine tree grove.

Tokyo Disneyland

Amusement Park

Tokyo Disneyland is a 115-acre theme park at the Tokyo Disney Resort in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, near Tokyo. Its main gate is directly adjacent to both Maihama Station and Tokyo Disneyland Station. It was the first Disney park to be built outside the United States, and it opened on April 15, 1983. The park was constructed by Walt Disney Imagineering in the same style as Disneyland in California and Magic Kingdom in Florida. It is owned by The Oriental Land Company, which licenses the theme from The Walt Disney Company. Tokyo Disneyland and its companion park, Tokyo DisneySea, are the only Disney parks not wholly or partially owned by the Walt Disney Company. There are seven themed areas in the park: the World Bazaar; the four classic Disney lands: Adventureland, Westernland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland; and two mini-lands: Critter Country and Mickey's Toontown. The park is noted for its extensive open spaces, to accommodate the large crowds that visit the park. In 2009, Tokyo Disneyland hosted approximately 13.65 million guests, ranking it as the third-most visited theme park in the world, behind its American sister parks, Magic Kingdom in Orlando and Disneyland Park in Anaheim. In 2011, the park hosted 14 million visitors, again ranking it as the world's third most visited theme park.

Universal Studios Japan

Amusement Park

Universal Studios Japan, located in Osaka, is one of four Universal Studios theme parks, owned and operated by USJ Co., Ltd. with a license from NBCUniversal. The park is similar to the Universal Orlando Resort since it also contains selected attractions from Universal Orlando Resort and Universal Studios Hollywood. Most visitors are Japanese tourists and tourists from other Asian countries such as Taiwan, Hong Kong, and South Korea. In 2005 Goldman Sachs became the largest shareholder in Universal Studios Japan. The park opened on March 31, 2001. Universal Studios Japan reached the milestone of attracting the first ten million visitors faster than any other theme park in the world. A total of eleven million guests visited Universal Studios Japan in its first year of operation. USJ is believed to have attracted 8.8 million visitors in fiscal year 2011, although the company does not officially disclose the number. The number of visitors had been in a downtrend after the highest attendance was recorded in the first year. Fiscal 2011 was the tenth anniversary year, and various commemorative events were implemented. As a result, attendance in this year achieved growth from the previous year’s approximate eight million. Universal Studios Japan greeted its 100 millionth visitor on Monday, October 29, 2012, since its opening in 2001. According to 2011 Theme Index Global Attraction Attendance Report, Universal Studios Japan is ranked ninth among the top 25 amusement/theme parks worldwide, attracting 8.5 million visitors in 2011, which is 4.2% larger than in the previous year.

Himeji Castle


Himeji Castle is a hilltop Japanese castle complex located in Himeji, in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. The castle is regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, comprising a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period. The castle is frequently known as Hakuro-jō or Shirasagi-jō because of its brilliant white exterior and supposed resemblance to a bird taking flight. Himeji Castle dates to 1333, when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346, and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For over 400 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the extensive bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters such as the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake.

Tokyo Skytree


Tokyo Skytree is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It became the tallest structure in Japan in 2010 and reached its full height of 634.0 metres in March 2011, making it the tallest tower in the world, displacing the Canton Tower, and the second tallest structure in the world after Burj Khalifa. Led by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters headed by NHK, the tower project forms the centrepiece of a large commercial development equidistant from Tokyo Skytree and Oshiage train stations, 7 km north-east of Tokyo station. One of its main purposes is to relay television and radio broadcast signals; Tokyo's current facility, Tokyo Tower with a height of 333 m, no longer gives complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage because it is surrounded by many high-rise buildings. The project was completed on 29 February 2012, with the tower opening to the public on 22 May 2012.

Tokyo Imperial Palace

Tourist attraction

Tokyo Imperial Palace is the main residence of the Emperor of Japan. It is a large park-like area located in the Chiyoda area of Tokyo close to Tokyo Station and contains several buildings including the main palace, the private residences of the imperial family, an archive, museum and administrative offices. It is built on the site of the old Edo castle. The total area including the gardens is 3.41 square kilometres. During the height of the 1980s Japanese property bubble, the palace grounds were valued by some as more than the value of all the real estate in the state of California.

Tokyo Tower


Tokyo Tower is a communications and observation tower located in Shiba Park, Minato, Tokyo, Japan. At 333 metres, it is the second-tallest artificial structure in Japan. The structure is an Eiffel Tower-inspired lattice tower that is painted white and international orange to comply with air safety regulations. Built in 1958, the tower's main sources of revenue are tourism and antenna leasing. Over 150 million people have visited the tower since its opening. FootTown, a four-storey building located directly under the tower, houses museums, restaurants and shops. Departing from there, guests can visit two observation decks. The two-storey Main Observatory is located at 150 metres, while the smaller Special Observatory reaches a height of 250 metres. The tower acts as a support structure for an antenna. Originally intended for television broadcasting, radio antennas were installed in 1961, but the tower is now used to broadcast signals for Japanese media outlets such as NHK, TBS and Fuji TV. Japan's planned digital television transition by July 2011 was problematic, however; Tokyo Tower's height was not high enough to adequately support complete terrestrial digital broadcasting to the area. A taller digital broadcasting tower, known as Tokyo Skytree, was completed on February 29, 2012.

Yasukuni Shrine

Tourist attraction

Yasukuni Shrine is a Shinto shrine located in Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan. It was initially created by Emperor Meiji to commemorate any individuals who had died in service of the Empire of Japan during the Meiji Restoration. The shrine's purpose has been expanded over the years and now lists the names, origins, birthdates, and places of death of 2,466,532 men, women and children from conflicts spanning from the Boshin War of 1867 to the end of World War II. The Yasukuni Honden shrine only lists the names of those who died in service of the Empire of Japan as it was created by Emperor Meiji specifically for this purpose. The Yasukuni Chinreisha shrine was created by the priesthood to commemorate those who fought in opposition to the Empire and everyone else who had died in war; it includes the Japanese soldiers of the Tokugawa Shogunate and Republic of Ezo as well as those representing foreign militaries such as the British, US, Chinese, Korean and South East Asian forces. The Honden shrine commemorates anyone who died on behalf of the Empire. Therefore it is not restricted to soldiers and also includes the names of relief workers, factory workers, citizens and those not of Japanese ethnicity such as Taiwanese and Koreans who served Japan. There are also commemorative statues to animals who perished in war and for the mothers who raised their children alone as a result of war. There is also an archive library which collects information about each individual enshrined and a conservative war museum.

Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo


Roppongi is a district of Minato, Tokyo, Japan, famous as home to the rich Roppongi Hills area and an active night club scene. Many foreign embassies are located in Roppongi, and the night life is popular with locals and foreigners alike. It is in the southern portion of the Yamanote Line loop, south of Akasaka and north of Azabu.



Harajuku is a district in Shibuya ward, Tokyo Prefecture. 1.The general name of the area from Harajuku station to the Omotesando area. According to the current Japanese addressing system, the neighbourhood ‘Jingu-mae’ is included in this greater area. 2. In 1965, the name of the town was abolished. Harajuku spans from block 1 to block 3, including the northern end of Omotesando and present Jingu-mae block 1, but Harajuku station and the area surrounding Takeshita Street lie outside the area.



Kiyomizu-dera, officially Otowa-san Kiyomizu-dera is an independent Buddhist temple in eastern Kyoto. The temple is part of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto UNESCO World Heritage site.

Tokyo DisneySea

Amusement Park

Tokyo DisneySea is a 176-acre theme park at the Tokyo Disney Resort located in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, just outside Tokyo. It opened on September 4, 2001. It is owned by The Oriental Land Company, which licenses Disney characters and themes from The Walt Disney Company. Tokyo DisneySea attracted an estimated 12 million visitors in 2009, making it the fifth-most-visited theme park in the world. In 2011, the park hosted 11.9 million visitors, making it the fourth most visited theme park in the world. Tokyo DisneySea was the second theme park to open at the Tokyo Disney Resort and the ninth park of the eleven worldwide Disney theme parks to open. Tokyo DisneySea was the fastest theme park in the world to reach the milestone of 10 million guests, having done so in 307 days after its grand opening. The previous record-holder was Universal Studios Japan 338 days after its opening. Tokyo DisneySea is also the most expensive theme park ever built, estimated to have cost over U.S. $4 billion. Tokyo DisneySea and its companion park Tokyo Disneyland are the only Disney parks in the world not owned by The Walt Disney Company.

International Stadium Yokohama

Sports Facility

The International Stadium Yokohama, also known as Nissan Stadium is a sports venue in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, inaugurated in March 1998. It is the home stadium of Yokohama F. Marinos of the J. League. Yokohama International Stadium has the highest seating capacity of any stadium in Japan, with a total of 72,327 seats. It hosted three first-round games during the 2002 FIFA World Cup, and the final game between Germany and Brazil was played there on 30 June 2002. The stadium is one of the planned football venues for the 2020 Summer Olympics. On 28 August 2009, Nissan Motors announced that they would not renew the contract for the naming rights of the stadium, which expired on 28 February 2010. But the negotiation was continued with the city office, and they made new construction for more three years on the expired day, 1 March 2010.

Nijō Castle

World Heritage Site

Nijō Castle is a flatland castle located in Kyoto, Japan. The castle consists of two concentric rings of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings and several gardens. The surface area of the castle is 275,000 square meters, of which 8000 square meters is occupied by buildings. It is one of the seventeen assets of Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Tōdai-ji, is a Buddhist temple complex located in the city of Nara, Japan. Its Great Buddha Hall, houses the world's largest bronze statue of the Buddha Vairocana, known in Japanese simply as Daibutsu. The temple also serves as the Japanese headquarters of the Kegon school of Buddhism. The temple is a listed UNESCO World Heritage Site as "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", together with seven other sites including temples, shrines and places in the city of Nara. Sika deer, regarded as messengers of the gods in the Shinto religion, roam the grounds freely.


Tourist attraction

Sensō-ji is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant. Formerly associated with the Tendai sect, it became independent after World War II. Adjacent to the temple is a Shinto shrine, the Asakusa Shrine.

Rainbow Bridge

Suspension Bridge

The Rainbow Bridge is a suspension bridge crossing northern Tokyo Bay between Shibaura Pier and the Odaiba waterfront development in Minato, Tokyo, Japan. Construction started in 1987 and was completed in 1993. The bridge is 798 metres long with a main span of 580 metres. Officially called the "Shuto Expressway No. 11 Daiba Route - Port of Tokyo Connector Bridge," the name "'Rainbow Bridge" was decided by the public. The towers supporting the bridge are white in color, designed to harmonize with the skyline of central Tokyo seen from Odaiba. There are lamps placed on the wires supporting the bridge, which are illuminated into three different colors, red, white and green every night using solar energy obtained during the day. The bridge can be accessed by foot from Tamachi Station or Shibaura-futō Station on the mainland side.

Ghibli Museum


Ghibli Museum is a museum featuring the Japanese anime work of Studio Ghibli, and is located in Inokashira Park in Mitaka, a western suburb of Tokyo, Japan. The museum is a fine arts museum, but does not take the concept of a usual fine arts museum. With many features that are child-oriented and a sprawling and occasionally mazelike interior, the museum is a playfully created place. Centered around the motto appearing on the museum's website "Let's become lost children together", or "let's lose our way together" as it is translated in the English leaflet. It has no set path or order of viewing. While the museum brochure contains a variety of languages, the signs within the museum are in Japanese only. Hayao Miyazaki wanted to create a museum that was interesting and relaxing to the soul. His goal was to create a museum “that makes you feel more enriched when you leave than when you entered!”


World Heritage Site

Yakushima, is one of the Ōsumi Islands belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The island, 504.88 km² in area, has a population of 13,178. Access to the island is by hydrofoil ferry, slow car ferry, or by air to Yakushima Airport. Administratively, the whole island is the town of Yakushima. The town also serves neighbouring Kuchinoerabujima. The majority of the island is within the borders of the Kirishima-Yaku National Park. The island has been a test site for Honda's hydrogen fuel cell vehicle research. Yakushima's electricity is more than 50% hydroelectric, and surplus power has been used to produce hydrogen gas in a small experiment by Kagoshima University. There are no hydrogen cars stationed on the island but a few electric cars are run by the municipality.

Fuji-Q Highland

Amusement Park

Fuji-Q Highland is an amusement park in Fujiyoshida, Yamanashi, Japan. The theme park is near the base of Mount Fuji. It has a number of roller coasters, as well as two haunted attractions: The Haunted Hospital, the world's second largest haunted attraction, and the newly built Hopeless Fortress. Other attractions include Thomas Land, a children's area with a Thomas the Tank Engine theme and attractions themed to Gundam and Evangelion. In 2006, on the 9th Season of The Amazing Race, the final 3 teams came here and rode Tondemina, Dodonpa and Fujiyama looking for a clue to their next destination. Fuji-Q's most famous roller coasters are the following: ⁕Fujiyama, 79 metres tall, 130 km/h, opened in 1996 and was once the world's tallest roller coaster. As of 2007 it is the world's 8th tallest, 5th longest, and 10th fastest roller coaster. ⁕Dodonpa, 52 metres tall, 172 km/h, opened in 2001 and was once the world's fastest roller coaster. As of 2013 it is the 4th fastest in the world but still has the highest acceleration at launch time. ⁕Eejanaika, 76 metres tall, 126 km/h, opened in 2006 and is only the second "4th Dimension roller coaster" ever built. As a "4th dimension" roller coaster its seats can rotate 360 degrees forward or backward in a controlled spin, thus allowing Eejanaika to invert 14 different times, even though the actual track inverts only three times. It surpasses the first built "4th dimension" roller coaster, X², in both height and speed.

Tokyo National Museum


The Tokyo National Museum, or TNM, established in 1872, is the oldest Japanese national museum, and the largest art museum in Japan. The museum collects, houses, and preserves a comprehensive collection of art works and archaeological objects of Asia, focusing on Japan. The museum holds over 110,000 objects, which includes 87 Japanese National Treasure holdings and 610 Important Cultural Property holdings. The museum also conducts research and organizes educational events related to its collection. The museum is located inside Ueno Park in Taito, Tokyo. The facilities consist of the Honkan, Tōyōkan, Hyōkeikan, Heiseikan, Hōryū-ji Hōmotsukan, as well as Shiryōkan, and other facilities. There are restaurants and shops within the museum's premises, as well as outdoor exhibitions and a garden where visitors can enjoy seasonal views. The museum's collections focus on ancient Japanese art and Asian art along the Silk Road. There is also a large collection of Greco-Buddhist art.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial

World Heritage Site

Hiroshima Peace Memorial, commonly called the Atomic Bomb Dome or Genbaku Dōmu, in Hiroshima, Japan, is part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. The ruin serves as a memorial to the people who were killed in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Over 70,000 people were killed instantly, and another 70,000 suffered fatal injuries from the radiation.

Meiji Shrine

Tourist attraction

Meiji Shrine, located in Shibuya, Tokyo, is the Shinto shrine that is dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shōken.

Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building


The Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, also referred to as Tokyo City Hall or Tochō for short, houses the headquarters of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, which governs not only the 23 wards, but also the cities, towns and villages that make up Tokyo as a whole. Located in Shinjuku, the building consists of a complex of three structures, each taking up a city block. The tallest and most prominent of the three is Tokyo Metropolitan Main building No.1, a tower 48 stories tall that splits into two sections at the 33rd floor. The building also has three levels below ground. The design of the building, by architect Kenzo Tange, has many symbolic touches, most notably the aforementioned split which re-creates the look of a Gothic cathedral. The other two buildings in the complex are the eight-story Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly Building and Tokyo Metropolitan Main Building No.2, which has 37 stories including three below ground. The two panoramic observation decks, one in each tower on floor 45, are free of charge to the public and contain gift shops and cafes. They are open till 23:00 on weekdays. Use of cameras is permitted, but tripods are forbidden.

Kabukichō, Tokyo


Kabukichō is an entertainment and red-light district in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. Kabukichō is the location of many host and hostess clubs, love hotels, shops, restaurants, and nightclubs, and is often called the "Sleepless Town". The district's name comes from late-1940s plans to build a kabuki theater: although the theater was never built, the name stuck. The area has many movie theaters, and is located near Shinjuku Station, Seibu Shinjuku Station, and several other major railway and subway stations.

Roppongi Hills

Building complex

Roppongi Hills is a New Urban Centre and one of Japan's largest integrated property developments, located in the Roppongi district of Minato, Tokyo. The architecture and use of the space is documented in the book Six Strata: Roppongi Hills Redefined. Constructed by building tycoon Minoru Mori, the mega-complex incorporates office space, apartments, shops, restaurants, cafés, movie theatres, a museum, a hotel, a major TV studio, an outdoor amphitheatre, and a few parks. The centerpiece is the 54-story Mori Tower. Mori's stated vision was to build an integrated development where high-rise inner-urban communities allow people to live, work, play, and shop in proximity to eliminate commuting time. He argued that this would increase leisure time, quality of life, and benefit Japan's national competitiveness. Seventeen years after the design's initial conception, the complex opened to the public on April 25, 2003.

Tokyo Disney Resort

Tourist attraction

Tokyo Disney Resort is a theme park and vacation resort located in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, just east of Tokyo. It is owned and operated by the Oriental Land Company with a license from The Walt Disney Company. The resort opened on April 15, 1983, as a single theme park, but developed into a resort with two theme parks, three Disney hotels, six non-Disney hotels, and a shopping complex. Tokyo Disneyland was the first Disney theme park opened outside the United States. Tokyo Disney Resort has three main entertainment sections: Tokyo Disneyland, Tokyo DisneySea and Ikspiari, which is a variation of the Downtown Disney shopping, dining and entertainment area found at the Disney resorts in California and Florida. It also contains Bon Voyage!, which is the official Disney goods specialty shop of Tokyo Disney Resort. Like the other Disney resorts, the Tokyo Disney Resort has 3 Disney-branded hotels; the Disney Ambassador Hotel, the Tokyo DisneySea Hotel MiraCosta, and the recently opened Tokyo Disneyland Hotel. There are six other hotels located on the Tokyo Disney Resort property. These, however, are not Disney-branded hotels and are owned by other companies, similar to the Hotel Plaza Boulevard hotels at Walt Disney World.

Nagoya Castle


Nagoya Castle is a Japanese castle located in Nagoya, central Japan. During the Edo period, Nagoya Castle was the center of one of the most important castle towns in Japan—Nagoya-juku— and it included the most important stops along the Minoji, which linked the Tōkaidō with the Nakasendō.

Sakura Island


Sakurajima is an active composite volcano and a former island in Kagoshima Prefecture in Kyushu, Japan. The lava flows of the 1914 eruption caused the former island to be connected with the Osumi Peninsula. The volcanic activity still continues, dropping large amounts of volcanic ash on the surroundings. Earlier eruptions built the white sands highlands in the region. Sakurajima is a composite mountain. Its summit is split into three peaks, Kita-dake, Naka-dake and Minami-dake which is active now. Today's Kita-dake is Sakurajima's highest, rising to 1,117 m above sea level. The mountain is located in a part of Kagoshima Bay known as Kinkō-wan. The former island is part of the city of Kagoshima. The surface of this volcanic peninsula is about 77 km².

Fushimi Inari-taisha

Tourist attraction

Fushimi Inari Taisha is the head shrine of Inari, located in Fushimi-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The shrine sits at the base of a mountain also named Inari which is 233 metres above sea level, and includes trails up the mountain to many smaller shrines. Since early Japan Inari was seen as the patron of business, and merchants and manufacturers have traditionally worshipped Inari. Each of the torii at Fushimi Inari Taisha is donated by a Japanese business. First and foremost, though, Inari is the god of rice. This popular shrine is said to have as many as 32,000 sub-shrines throughout Japan.

Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan


The Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan is an aquarium located in the ward of Minato in Osaka, Japan, near Osaka Bay. It is one of the largest public aquariums in the world, and is a member of the Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The aquarium is about a five-minute walk from Osakako Station on the Osaka Municipal Subway Chūō Line, and is next to the Tempozan Ferris Wheel.

Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium


The Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium is located within the Ocean Expo Park in Okinawa, Japan. It welcomed its 20 millionth visitor on 30 March 2010 and is a member of the Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Ueno Zoo


The Ueno Zoo is a 14.3-hectare zoo, managed by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, and located in Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. It is Japan's oldest zoo, opening on March 20, 1882. It is a five-minute walk from the Park Exit of Ueno Station, with convenient access from Tokyo's public-transportation network. The Ueno Zoo Monorail, the first monorail in the country, connects the eastern and western parts of the grounds. The zoo is in Ueno Park, a large urban park that is home to museums, a small amusement park, and other attractions. The zoo is closed Mondays.

Amami Ōshima


Amami Ōshima is one of the Satsunan Islands, and is the largest island within the Amami archipelago between Kyūshū and Okinawa. The island, 712.35 km² in area, has a population of approximately 73,000 persons. Administratively it is divided into the city of Amami, the towns of Tatsugō, Setouchi, and the villages of Uken and Yamato in Kagoshima Prefecture. Much of the island is within the borders of the Amami Guntō Quasi-National Park.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

Tourist attraction

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park is a memorial park in the center of Hiroshima, Japan. It is dedicated to the legacy of Hiroshima as the first city in the world to suffer a nuclear attack, and to the memories of the bomb's direct and indirect victims. The location of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park was once the city’s busiest downtown commercial and residential district. The park was built on open field that was created by the explosion. Today there are a number of memorials and monuments, museums, and lecture halls, which draw over a million visitors annually. The annual 6 August Peace Memorial Ceremony, which is sponsored by the city of Hiroshima, is also held in the park. The purpose of the Peace Memorial Park is to not only memorialize the victims, but also to establish the memory of nuclear horrors and advocate world peace.

Yoyogi Park

Tourist attraction

Yoyogi Park is one of the largest parks in Tokyo, Japan located adjacent to Harajuku Station and Meiji Shrine in Shibuya.

Yokohama Landmark Tower


The Yokohama Landmark Tower is the tallest building and 3rd tallest structure in Japan, standing 296.3 m high. It is located in the Minato Mirai 21 district of Yokohama city, right next to Yokohama Museum of Art. Work on the building was finished in 1993. When opened, it had the highest observation deck in Japan. The building contains a five-star hotel which occupies floors 49-70, with 603 rooms in total. The lower 48 floors contain shops, restaurants, clinics, and offices. The building contains two tuned mass dampers on the 71st floor on opposite corners of the building. On the 69th floor there is an observatory, Sky Garden, from which one can see a 360-degree view of the city, and on clear days Mount Fuji. The tower contains what were at their inauguration the world's second fastest elevators, which reach speeds of 12.5 m/s. This speed allows the elevator to reach the 69th floor in approximately 40 seconds. The elevators' speed record was surpassed by elevators of Taipei 101 in 2004. The building was designed by Hugh Stubbins and Associates, now KlingStubbins.

Yokohama Arena


Yokohama Arena is an indoor arena located in Yokohama, Japan. The capacity of the arena is 17,000 and was opened in 1989. The arena was modeled after US sports venue Madison Square Garden in New York City. It is a five-minute walk from the closest subway station, Shin-Yokohama Station on the JR/Yokohama Municipal Subway. As one of the largest concert venues in the Kantō region, it is a frequent location for artists to end their tours. The spacious stage allows for more complex set design and lighting, but the reasonable size makes it easier to sell out than the Tokyo Dome.



The Bunkamura is a concert hall, theater and museum located in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan, operated by Tokyu Group.

Sanrio Puroland

Amusement Park

Sanrio Puroland is an indoor theme park located in Tama New Town, Tokyo, Japan that attracts over 1.5 million visitors per year. Opened on December 7, 1990, the theme park is run by the Sanrio company, and hosts various musicals, restaurants, attractions, and theme rides using popular characters such as Hello Kitty, My Melody, Cinnamoroll, Jewelpet and many more. While many of these attractions are only in Japanese, Puroland attracts many visitors from overseas as well as Japan because of the worldwide popularity of these characters. Puroland also has an extensive gift shop selling Sanrio character merchandise. Tourists visiting during the summer will be able to see fireworks on a daily basis. It includes a boat ride similar to It's a Small World in which Cinnamorroll leads riders to a party being held by Hello Kitty, passing through the homes of several Sanrio characters, including Kerroppi's pond and Badtz Maru's cave. Visitors can also tour Kitty's house which includes Renaissance style portraits of her family, fancy furniture and a bath-tub shaped like her face, and displays of her purses and jewelry. Her computer and television are also in her head shape. There are three live theaters and one film theater. It also includes attraction areas themed to candy, ice cream, bread, juice, and chocolate factories.


Amusement Park

Hanayashiki is an amusement park in Asakusa, Taitō, Tokyo that has operated since 1853. It is operated by Hanayashiki Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Namco Bandai Holdings. It is claimed to be the oldest amusement park in Japan.

Tokara Islands

Island Group

The Tokara Islands is an archipelago in the Nansei Islands, and are part of the Satsunan Islands, which is in turn part of the Ryukyu Archipelago. The 150 kilometres chain consists of twelve small islands located between Yakushima and Amami-Oshima. The islands have a total area of 101.35 square kilometres. Administratively, the whole group belongs to Toshima Village, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. Only seven of the islands are permanently inhabited. The islands, especially Takarajima, are home to the Tokara Pony.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Kōfuku-ji is a Buddhist temple in the city of Nara, Japan. The temple is the national headquarters of the Hossō school and is one of the eight Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Modern Art Museum

The Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, Japan, is the foremost museum collecting and exhibiting contemporary Japanese art. This Tokyo museum is also known by the English acronym MOMAT. MOMAT is known for its collection of 20th-century art and includes Western-style and Nihonga artists.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Tō-ji is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect in Kyoto, Japan. It once had a partner, Sai-ji and, together, they stood alongside the Rashomon, gate to the Heian capital. It was formally known as Kyō-ō-gokoku-ji which indicates that it previously functioned as a temple providing protection for the nation. Tō-ji is located in Minami-ku near the intersection of Ōmiya Street and Kujō Street, southwest of Kyoto Station. Tō-ji was founded in the early Heian period. The temple dates from 796, two years after the capital moved to Heian-kyō. Together with its partner Sai-in, and the temple Shingon-in, it was one of only three Buddhist temples allowed in the capital at the time, and is the only of the three to survive to the present. Tō-ji is often associated with Kōbō Daishi. The well-known Buddhist priest was put in charge of Tō-ji in 823 by order of Emperor Saga. The temple's principal image is of Yakushi Nyorai, the Medicine Buddha. The pagoda of Tō-ji stands 54.8 m high, and is the tallest wooden tower in Japan. It dates from the Edo period, when it was rebuilt by order of the third Tokugawa Shogun, Iemitsu. The pagoda has been, and continues to be, a symbol of Kyoto. Entrance into the pagoda itself is permitted only a few days a year.


Tourist attraction

Arashiyama is a district on the western outskirts of Kyoto, Japan. It also refers to the mountain across the Ōi River, which forms a backdrop to the district. Arashiyama is a nationally-designated Historic Site and Place of Scenic Beauty.

Shiretoko National Park

National park

Shiretoko National Park covers most of the Shiretoko Peninsula at the northeastern tip of the island of Hokkaidō, Japan. The word "Shiretoko" is derived form an Ainu word "sir etok", meaning "end of the Earth". One of the most remote regions in all of Japan, much of the peninsula is only accessible on foot or by boat. The park is best known as the home of Japan's largest brown bear population and for offering views of the disputed Kunashiri Island, claimed by Japan. The park has a hot springs waterfall called Kamuiwakka Falls. Kamui wakka means "water of the gods" in Ainu. The forests of the park are temperate and subalpine mixed forests; the main tree species include Sakhalin fir, Erman's birch and Mongolian oak. Beyond the forest limit there are impenetrable Siberian Dwarf Pine thickets. In 2005, UNESCO designated the area a World Heritage Site, advising to develop the property jointly with Kuril Islands of Russia as a transboundary "World Heritage Peace Park".

Katsura Imperial Villa

Tourist attraction

The Katsura Imperial Villa, or Katsura Detached Palace, is a villa with associated gardens and outbuildings in the western suburbs of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of Japan's most important large-scale cultural treasures. Its gardens are a masterpiece of Japanese gardening, and the buildings are even more important, one of the greatest achievements of Japanese architecture. The palace includes a shoin, tea houses, and a strolling garden. It provides an invaluable window into the villas of princes of the Edo period. The palace formerly belonged to the princes of the Hachijō-no-miya family. The Imperial Household Agency administers it, and accepts visitors by appointment. The current Prince Katsura, whose title is an Imperial grant and is unrelated to the former Katsura-no-miya family, does not live there, but like all the other members of the Imperial Family lives in Tokyo.

Shinjuku Gyoen

Tourist attraction

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden is a large park with an eminent garden in Shinjuku and Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. It was originally a residence of the Naitō family in the Edo period. Afterwards, it became a garden under the management of the Imperial Household Agency of Japan. It is now a park under the jurisdiction of the national Ministry of the Environment.

Eikan-dō Zenrin-ji

Tourist attraction

Eikan-dō Zenrin-ji is the head temple for the Seizan branch of Japan's Jōdo-shū Buddhist sect, located in the town of Eikandō, in Kyoto's Sakyō-ku. It was founded by Shinshō, a pupil of Kūkai, and is famous for its fall foliage and for its prominence in the past as a center of learning.

Hiroshima Castle

Tourist attraction

Hiroshima Castle, sometimes called Carp Castle was a castle in Hiroshima, Japan which was the home of the daimyō of the Hiroshima han. The castle was constructed in the 1590s, but was briefly destroyed by the atomic bombing on 6 August 1945. It was rebuilt in 1958, a replica of the original which now serves as a museum of Hiroshima's history prior to World War II.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum


The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum is located in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, in central Hiroshima, Japan. It was established in August 1955 with the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Hall. The museum exhibit presents the facts of the atomic bombing, with the aims of contributing to the abolition of nuclear weapons throughout the world, and of promoting world peace. It is the most popular of Hiroshima's destinations for school field-trips from all over Japan and for international visitors, too. Fifty-three million people had visited the museum from its opening in 1955 through 2005. The number of visitors is over one million per year. The architect of the main building was Kenzo Tange.

Mount Takao


Mount Takao is a mountain in the city of Hachiōji, Tokyo, Japan. It is protected within Meiji no Mori Takao Quasi-National Park. Standing 599 metres tall and located within an hour of downtown Tokyo, it is a popular hiking spot, with eight hiking courses and more than 2.5 million annual visitors. The Tama Forest Science Garden is also located at the mountain's base. Mount Takao is closely associated with tengu, minor kami from Japanese folklore, and the daitengu Naigubu. A Buddhist temple, Takaosan Yakuōin Yūkiji, is located on the mountain.

Mount Maya


Mount Maya is a 698.6 m high mountain in Kobe, Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. This mountain is one of the major peaks of the Rokkō Mountains, and is the most popular peak for visitors on the West-Rokkō Mountains.

Miho Museum


The Miho Museum is located southeast of Kyoto, Japan, near the town of Shigaraki, in Shiga Prefecture. The museum was the dream of Mihoko Koyama, the heiress to the Toyobo textile business, and one of the wealthiest women in Japan. In 1970 Koyama founded the Shinji Shumeikai spiritual movement which is now said to have some 300,000 members worldwide. Furthermore, in the 1990s Koyama commissioned the museum to be built close to the Shumei temple in the Shiga mountains.

Edo-Tokyo Museum


The Edo-Tokyo Museum is a museum of the history of Tokyo during the Edo period. It was established in 1993. The main features of the permanent exhibitions are the life-size replica of the Nihonbashi, which was the bridge leading into Edo; the Nakamuraza theatre; and scale models of towns and buildings from the Edo, Meiji and Shōwa periods. The museum is located in Ryōgoku adjacent to the Ryōgoku Kokugikan. It was designed by Kiyonori Kikutake. The distinctive elevated shape of the museum building is modelled after an old storehouse in the kurazukuri style. The Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum is a branch of the Edo-Tokyo Museum.

Nagashima Spa Land

Amusement Park

Nagashima Spa Land is a major amusement park in Kuwana, Mie Prefecture, Japan. It features several roller coasters, thrill rides, and kid rides, a giant Ferris wheel, and a water park. As of 2012, Nagashima Spa Land is the 18th most visited amusement park in the world.



Kabuki-za in Ginza was the principal theater in Tokyo for the traditional kabuki drama form.


World Heritage Site

Kasuga Grand Shrine is a Shinto shrine in the city of Nara, in Nara Prefecture, Japan. Established in 768 AD and rebuilt several times over the centuries, it is the shrine of the Fujiwara family. The interior is famous for its many bronze lanterns, as well as the many stone lanterns that lead up the shrine. The architectural style Kasuga-zukuri takes its name from Kasuga Shrine's honden. Kasuga Shrine, and the Kasugayama Primeval Forest near it, are registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara". The path to Kasuga Shrine passes through Deer Park. In Deer Park, deer are able to roam freely and are believed to be sacred messengers of the Shinto gods that inhabit the shrine and surrounding mountainous terrain. Kasuga Shrine and the deer have been featured in several paintings and works of art of the Nambokucho Period. Over three thousand stone lanterns line the way. The Man'yo Botanical Garden, Nara is adjacent to the shrine.

Atsuta Shrine

Tourist attraction

Atsuta Shrine is a Shinto shrine traditionally believed to have been established during the reign of Emperor Keikō located in Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture in Japan. The shrine is familiarly known as Atsuta-Sama or simply as Miya. Since ancient times, it has been especially revered, ranking with the Great Shrine of Ise. The 200,000 m² shrine complex draws over 9 million visitors annually.

Huis Ten Bosch

Amusement Park

Huis Ten Bosch is a theme park in Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan, which recreates the Netherlands by displaying real size copies of old Dutch buildings. The name Huis Ten Bosch literally translates into English as "House in the Forest". It is named after Huis ten Bosch, one of the three official residences of the Dutch Royal Family, located in The Hague in the Netherlands and home to Princess Beatrix. The park features many Dutch-style buildings such as hotels, villas, theatres, museums, shops and restaurants, along with canals, windmills, amusement rides, and a park planted in seasonal flowers. Huis Ten Bosch, which opened on March 25, 1992, is located on Hario Island in the southern part of Sasebo, facing Ōmura Bay. Its location reflects historical relations between the Netherlands and Japan, which began in 1609 when a trading post was opened by the Dutch in Hirado, not far from Sasebo. The park is open daily from 9.00 a.m. to 9.30 p.m.. A day "passport" ticket, covering entry and a number of attractions within the park costs 5,600 yen for adults and 4,400 yen for children. The park can be reached by JR train or bus from Nagasaki. It can also be reached by boat from Nagasaki Airport or from Sasebo.

Daisetsuzan National Park

National park

Daisetsuzan National Park, or Taisetsuzan is located in the mountainous center of the northern Japanese island of Hokkaidō. At 2,267.64 square kilometres, Daisetsuzan is the largest national park in Japan, and is approximately the size of Kanagawa Prefecture. Daisetsuzan, meaning "great snowy mountains", an apt description of these peaks. There are 16 peaks over 2,000 metres in Daisetsuzan National Park, both with and without trails. The park offers some of the most rugged scenery in Japan. Asahidake, located in the north of the park, is the highest peak in Hokkaidō. Daisetsuzan National Park spans two subprefectures of Hokkaidō, Kamikawa and Tokachi. Daisetsuzan National Park was established in 1934.

Nara Park

Tourist attraction

Nara Park is a public park located in the city of Nara, Japan, at the foot of Mount Wakakusa, established in 1880. Administratively, the park is under the control of Nara Prefecture. The park is one of the "Places of Scenic Beauty" designated by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The over 1,200 wild sika deer freely roaming around in the park is also under designation of MEXT, classified as a "Natural Monument." While the official size of the park is about 502 ha, the area including the grounds of Tōdai-ji, Kōfuku-ji and Kasuga Shrine, which are either on the edge or surrounded by Nara Park, is as large as 660 ha. Jinrikisha services can be found near the entrances to popular sites as Tōdai-ji or Kōfuku-ji. While Nara Park is usually associated with the broad areas of the temples and the park proper, there are now previously private gardens open to public. These gardens make use of the temple buildings as adjunct features of their landscapes. The park is also home to the Nara National Museum and Todai-ji, where the largest wooden building in the world houses a 50' tall statue of Buddha.

Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography


The Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography is an art museum focused on photography. The museum was founded by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, and is located in Meguro-ku, a short walk from Ebisu station in southwest Tokyo. The museum also has a movie theater The museum nicknames itself "Syabi"

Kyoto National Museum

Art Gallery

The Kyoto National Museum is one of the major art museums in Japan. The museum is located in Higashiyama Ward in Kyoto. The collections of the Kyoto National Museum focus on pre-modern Japanese and Asian art. The main collection is currently undergoing renovation and is scheduled to reopen in spring 2014.

Yokohama Chinatown

Tourist attraction

Yokohama Chinatown is located in Yokohama, Japan, which is located just south of Tokyo. Its history is about 150 years long. Today only a few Chinese people still live in Chinatown, but it has a population of about 3,000 to 4,000. Most of the residents are from Guangzhou but many come from other regions. Yokohama Chinatown is the largest Chinatown not only in Japan but also in Asia and it is one of the largest in the world. There are roughly 250 Chinese-owned/themed shops and restaurants scattered throughout the district, with the highest concentration centered around a 300 square metre area.

Nikkō National Park

National park

Nikkō National Park is a national park in the Kantō region, on the main island of Honshū in Japan. The park spreads over four prefectures: Tochigi, Gunma, Fukushima, and Niigata, and was established in 1934.

Yokohama Stadium

Sports Facility

Yokohama Stadium is a stadium in Naka Ward, Yokohama, Japan. It opened in 1978 and holds 30,000 people. It is primarily used for baseball and is the home field of the Yokohama BayStars. The stadium is unique, because it features dirt around the bases and pitcher's mound, but with dirt colored turf infield and base paths. The entire green portion of the field is now turf. The stadium is one of only three venues in Japan, with an American look, the others are Kobe Sports Park Baseball Stadium in Kobe and Mazda Stadium in Hiroshima. It hosted an Australian Rules Football match and drew the second largest crowd, for such an event, outside of Australia. Carlos Santana and Masayoshi Takanaka performed at the stadium on August 2, 1981. Japanese concert souvenir tour program for Santana/Takanaka, for their "Summer Live Super Session" tour of Japan. Michael Jackson performed at the stadium during his Bad World Tour in five sold out concerts, more than any other artist in Yokohama, for a total audience of 190,000 fans on September 25, 26, and 27, 1987 and October 3–4, 1987 and one of the concerts was recorded and released as VHS titled Michael Jackson Live in Japan.

Gifu Castle


Gifu Castle is a castle located in the city of Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Along with Mount Kinka and the Nagara River, it is one of the main symbols of the city.

Odori Park

Tourist attraction

Odori Park is a park located in the heart of Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. Ōdōri means "large street" in Japanese. It stretches east to west through Nishi 1 chōme, Ōdōri to Nishi 12 chōme, Ōdōri, and divides the city into north and south sections. Odori Park spans about 1.5 km and covers 78,901 m². During the urban planning of Sapporo, it was originally designated as the main street but it eventually became a park. Throughout the year, many events and ceremonies such as the Sapporo Lilac Festival and the Sapporo Snow Festival are held in the park, and local landmarks including the Sapporo TV Tower and the Sapporo City Archive Museum are located within its boundaries.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Yakushi-ji is one of the most famous imperial and ancient Buddhist temples in Japan, located in Nara. The temple is the headquarters of the Hossō school of Japanese Buddhism. Yakushi-ji is one of the sites that are collectively inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, under the name of "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara." The main object of veneration, Yakushi Nyorai, also named "The Medicine Buddha", was one of first Buddhist Deities to arrive in Japan from China in 680, and gives the temple its name.

National Museum of Art, Osaka

Art Gallery

The National Museum of Art is a subterranean Japanese art museum located on the island of Nakanoshima, located between the Dōjima River and the Tosabori River, about 5 minutes west of Higobashi Station in central Osaka. The official Japanese title of the museum translates as the "National Museum of International Art". The museum is also known by the English acronym NMAO.

Akan National Park

National park

Akan National Park is a national park located on the island of Hokkaidō, Japan. Along with Daisetsuzan National Park, these are the two oldest national parks in Hokkaidō. The park was established December 4, 1934. Akan is an area of volcanic craters and forests, covering 90,481 hectares. The park is famous for its crystal clear lakes, its hot springs, and its large marimo. It is the only place where marimo of appreciable size form naturally in Japan.

The National Art Center, Tokyo


The National Art Center, Tokyo is a museum in Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo, Japan. A joint project of the Agency for Cultural Affairs and the National Museums Independent Administrative Institution, it stands on a site formerly occupied by a research facility of the University of Tokyo. The museum has an exhibition of 600 pieces, concentrating on 20th-century painting and modern art, for its opening on January 21, 2007. The director is Hideki Hayashida. The architect for the museum was Kisho Kurokawa. The facility has 47,960 m² of floor space on a 30,000 m² site with four stories above ground and one below. Access is from Nogizaka Station on the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line.

Shimogamo Shrine

Tourist attraction

Shimogamo Shrine in Japanese, is the common name of an important Shinto sanctuary in the Shimogamo district of Kyoto city's Sakyō ward. Its formal name is Kamo-mioya-jinja. It is one of the oldest Shinto shrines in Japan and is one of the seventeen Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. The term Kamo-jinja in Japanese is a general reference to Shimogamo Shrine and Kamigamo Shrine, the traditionally linked Kamo shrines of Kyoto; Shimogamo is the older of the pair, being believed to be 100 years older than Kamigamo, and dating to the 6th century, centuries before Kyoto became the capital of Japan. The Kamo-jinja serve the function of protecting Kyoto from malign influences. The jinja name identifies the Kamo family of kami or deities who are venerated. The name also refers to the ambit of shrine's nearby woods, which are vestiges of the primeval forest of Tadasu no Mori. In addition, the shrine name references the area's early inhabitants, the Kamo clan, many of whom continue to live near the shrine their ancestors traditionally served. Shimogamo Shrine is dedicated to the veneration of Tamayori-hime and her father, Kamo Taketsunomi. Tamayori-hime is the mother of Kamo Wakeikazuchi, who was sired by Honoikazuchi-no-mikoto. Kamigamo Shrine, the other of the two Kamo shrines of Kyoto, is dedicated to Kamo Wakeikazuchi. These kami are variously associated with thunder.

Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum


The Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum is a dinosaur museum located in the city of Katsuyama, Fukui Prefecture, Japan. It is one of Japan's many museums which are supported by a prefecture. In addition to being the only dedicated dinosaur museum in all of Japan, it is one of the "World's Three Great Dinosaur Museums" along with the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Canada and the Zigong Dinosaur Museum in China. The museum signed a sister museum agreement with the Royal Tyrrell Museum on November 23, 2000, and contains some exhibits from the museum.

Space World

Amusement Park

Space World is a theme park in Yahatahigashi-ku, Kitakyūshū, Japan. Created in 1990 by Nippon Steel when the company was downsizing its steel plant in the ward, it is currently operated by Space World Inc., a subsidiary of Kamori Kankō. Space World offers a variety of attractions, with events held daily, and Space Camp, Japan's first authentic educational space experience facility.

Takeshita Street

Tourist attraction

Takeshita Street is a pedestrian-only street lined with fashion boutiques, cafes and restaurants in Harajuku in Tokyo, Japan. Stores on Takeshita Street include major chains such as The Body Shop, McDonald's and 7-Eleven, but most of the businesses are small independent shops that carry an array of styles. The shops on this street are often a bellwether for broader fads, and some are known as "antenna shops," which manufacturers seed with prototypes for test-marketing. Takeshita Street was a reliable place to go and purchase fake Japanese and American street brand goods from the early 1990s to 2004. Since 2004, a stronger metropolitan government stance on counterfeit merchandise has led to a decrease of such items being available to the public. Located directly across from the exit of JR East's Harajuku Station, Takeshita Street is very popular with young teenagers, particularly those visiting Tokyo on school trips, or local young people shopping for small "cute" goods at weekends.

Asahiyama Zoo


The Asahiyama Zoo is a municipal zoo opened in July 1967 in Asahikawa, Hokkaidō, Japan, and is the northernmost zoo in the country. In August 2004, over 320,000 people visited the zoo, the second highest number of visitors among all the zoos in Japan. Located in Higashi Asahikawa, on the outskirts of Asahikawa, the Asahiyama Zoo is accredited by the Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Arima Onsen

Tourist attraction

Arima Onsen is an onsen, or hot springs in Kita-ku, Kobe, Japan. This Onsen is still a hidden treasure of modern Kobe, behind Mount Rokko. It attracts many Japanese who want tranquility with beautiful natural surroundings and yet easy access from the busy cities in the Kansai metropolitan area including Osaka.

Yomiuri Land

Amusement Park

Yomiuri Land is one of the larger and well known Japanese amusement parks near Tokyo, first opened in 1964. It is situated on hillsides, and features modern thrill rides such as roller coasters and water flumes. It is home to Yomiuri Giants Stadium, one of the training fields for the Yomiuri Giants baseball team, and was the primary training ground before Tokyo Dome was completed. It is operated and run by the Yomiuri Group, the parent of media conglomerate Yomiuri Shimbun. Recently a bathhouse was constructed to attract more senior citizens. Entrance fees are 1600 yen for adults, 800 yen for children and seniors.


Tourist attraction

Ikspiari is a shopping, dining, and entertainment complex at the Tokyo Disney Resort in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan. Owned and operated by The Oriental Land Company, it is the Japanese equivalent of the Downtown Disney complexes at the Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resorts in the USA, and Disney Village at Disneyland Paris, France. Ikspiari is close to Maihama Station on the Keiyō Line from Tokyo, and is also served by Resort Gateway Station on the Disney Resort Line.

Shugakuin Imperial Villa

Tourist attraction

The Shugaku-in Imperial Villa, or Shugaku-in Detached Palace, is a set of gardens and outbuildings in the hills of the eastern suburbs of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of Japan's most important large-scale cultural treasures; its gardens are one of the great masterpieces of Japanese gardening. Although styled as a "detached palace", often translated as "imperial villa", there were never any large-scale buildings there, as there are at the Katsura Imperial Villa. The 53-hectare grounds actually include three separate gardens, the Lower Garden, Middle Garden, and Upper Garden, of which the latter is the most important. The Imperial Household Agency administers it, and accepts visitors by appointment.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo

Art Gallery

The Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo is a contemporary art museum in Koto, Tokyo, Japan. The museum is located in Kiba Park. It was opened in 1995.

Osaka Science Museum

Science Museum

The Osaka Science Museum is a science museum in Naka-no-shima, Kita-ku, Osaka, Japan. The museum is located between the Dōjima River and the Tosabori River, above Osaka's subterranean National Museum of Art. Opened in 1989, the museum was constructed to mark the 100th anniversary of Osaka City. The construction was funded through a 6.5 billion yen donation toward building costs from Kansai Electric. Its theme is "The Universe and Energy" and it was opened in 1989. Before the war a similar museum opened in 1937. It was known as the Osaka City Electricity Science Museum and it was both the first science museum and the first planetarium in Japan. The Science Museum's primary permanent exhibition consists of four floors of mainly interactive science exhibits, totaling 200 items, with each floor focusing on a different theme. There is also a live science show with science demonstrations several times per day. Like the rest of the museum, these demonstrations are in Japanese only and visitors may require prior scientific knowledge to enjoy them. The two secondary exhibits, both available separately from the primary exhibit, are a planetarium, which has a dome with a radius of 26.5 meters, the fifth largest in the world, and an Omnimax theatre, which projects the images of the heavens. In July 2004, the planetarium reopened after a renovation displaying the entire night sky as a next-generation digital image.

Shinjuku Golden Gai

Tourist attraction

Shinjuku Golden Gai is a small area of Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, famous both as an area of architectural interest and for its nightlife. It is composed of a network of six narrow alleys, connected by even narrower passageways which are just about wide enough for a single person to pass through. Over 200 tiny shanty-style bars, clubs and eateries are squeezed into this area.

Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum


The Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum is in the city of Nagasaki, Japan. The museum is a remembrance to the second atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki on 9 August 1945 at 11:02:35 am. Next to the museum is the Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims, built in 2003 and it marks the hypocentre of the event. This event marked a new era in war making Nagasaki a symbolic location for a memorial. Its counterpart in Hiroshima is the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. The location symbolizes the nuclear age and since Nagasaki and Hiroshima were both destroyed by the atomic bomb it signifies the commitment to peace. The museum was completed in April 1996 and replaced the International Culture Hall, which had been in a state of detioration. The museum covers the history of the event as a story, focusing on the attack and events leading up to it. It also covers the history of nuclear weapons development. The museum displays photographs, relics and documents related to the atomic bombing.

Aoba Castle

Tourist attraction

Aoba Castle, also known as Sendai Castle, was the castle of the Date family. Built by Date Masamune atop Mount Aoba, it commanded a highly defensible strategic position overlooking the city of Sendai. Although the "castle" was the headquarters of the Date family and administrative center of Mutsu Province, the peace that followed the Battle of Sekigahara and the beginning of the Tokugawa shogunate, mitigated the dangers of attack. Plans for the tenshu, equivalent to the main keep of European castles, were drawn, but it was never built. The castle was one of the nerve centers of the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei during the Boshin War, when Date Yoshikuni was lord of Sendai. Taken over by the new government in the aftermath of Sendai's surrender, it was partially dismantled in the 1870s. Many of the remaining buildings on the castle site were damaged in the firebombing of Sendai during World War II, but sections of the castle survived, and a great deal of it, including the stone base, some walls, and some wooden structures, have either been rebuilt or are currently being rebuilt. The castle site also contains a Gokoku Shrine, as well as a large equestrian statue of Date Masamune.

Nara National Museum


The Nara National Museum is one of the pre-eminent national art museums in Japan.

National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto

Modern Art Museum

The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto is an art museum in Kyoto, Japan. This Kyoto museum is also known by the English acronym MoMAK.

National Museum of Japanese History


The National Museum of Japanese History, commonly known in Japanese as Rekihaku, is a history museum in Sakura, Chiba, Japan. The museum was founded in 1981 as an inter-university research consortium, and opened in 1983. The collections of museum focus on the history, archaeology, and folk culture of Japan.


Amusement Park

Expoland, located in Suita, Osaka, Japan, was opened as the amusement zone at the International Exposition in 1970 and thrived for over 30 years as an amusement park. There were more than 40 rides and attractions, 19 restaurants and shops. On May 5, 2007, a 19-year-old university student from Higashiomi, Shiga was killed and nineteen other guests were injured when the Fujin Raijin II derailed at Expoland. Initial reports said that forty people were injured, with thirty-one being taken to hospital. An investigation revealed that the ride derailed due to a broken axle. None of the ride vehicle's axles had been replaced for fifteen years. Following this accident, similar coasters at other Japanese parks were voluntarily shut down and inspected to see if they could also have the same axle flaw. Expoland was cited by authorities for faulty maintenance when similar axle cracks were found on a second train a month later. The park reopened after the accident but closed again on December 9, 2007, citing a lack of customers. On February 9, 2009, its owners finally decided that the park was closed down for good.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Gangō-ji is an ancient Buddhist temple, that was once one of the powerful Nanto Shichi Daiji, in Nara, Japan.

Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum


The Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum is a museum dedicated to instant noodles and Cup Noodles, as well as its creator and founder, Momofuku Ando. The museum is located in Ikeda in Osaka, and is located within walking distance of Ikeda Station on the Hankyu-Takarazuka Line. Admission is free. There is also a CupNoodles Museum located in Yokohama, which features four stories of fun-filled exhibitions and attractions. This location includes various exhibits to display the history of instant ramen and Momofuku Ando's story. Admission is free for high school age children and younger, and 500 yen for adults. Both museums have an instant ramen workshop allowing visitors to make their own "fresh" instant noodles. Reservations must be made in advance to enjoy this feature at the museum. There is also a noodle factory where visitors can assemble their own personal Cup Noodles from pre-made ingredients for a small fee of 300 yen.

Meiji Mura


Meiji Mura is an open-air architectural museum/theme park in Inuyama, near Nagoya in Aichi prefecture, Japan. It was opened on March 18, 1965. The museum preserves historic buildings from Japan's Meiji, Taisho, and early Shōwa periods. Over 60 historical buildings have been moved and reconstructed onto 1 square kilometre of rolling hills alongside Lake Iruka. The most noteworthy building there is the reconstructed main entrance and lobby of Frank Lloyd Wright's landmark Imperial Hotel, which originally stood in Tokyo from 1923 to 1967, when the main structure was demolished to make way for a new, larger version of the hotel.

Sapporo Beer Museum


The Sapporo Beer Museum is a museum located in the Sapporo Garden Park in Higashi-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan. Registered as one of the Hokkaidō Heritage sites in 2004, the museum is the only beer museum in Japan. The red-brick building was erected originally as a factory of the Sapporo Sugar Company in 1890, and later opened as a museum in July 1987. The building also houses the Sapporo Beer Garden in the south wing.

Wakayama Castle

Tourist attraction

Wakayama Castle in Wakayama, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, sits at the mouth of the Kii River. Originally Ōta castle, home of the Saiga Ikki, it was captured by Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1585, during the Siege of Negoro-ji; many monks from Negoro-ji sought refuge in Ōta, which was soon destroyed by flood. Hideyoshi ordered the building of dams on three sides of the castle, focusing the rainwaters and diverting the river to ruin the castle. As hunger set in, the samurai, monks, and peasants inside Ōta surrendered, and fifty warrior monks led a final charge against Hideyoshi's army, committing honorable suicide. Ōta was rebuilt as a temple for the Shinshu branch of Japanese Buddhism, severed from its history as a home to warrior monks. Wakayama Castle was then built on the same site, under the supervision of Toyotomi Hidenaga, Hideyoshi's brother, with Tōdō Takatora's participation. Asano Yoshinaga arrived in 1600 to serve as feudal lord, under Tokugawa Ieyasu. The castle was later attacked, in 1615, by forces loyal to Toyotomi Hideyori, who were trying to end the siege of Osaka. In the summer of 1615, parts of the Osaka garrison left the city, ambushing various elements of the Tokugawa forces. Ono Harunaga, Hanawa Naoyuki and Okabe Noritsuna led part of the garrison in attacking Wakayama Castle, held by Asano Nagaakira at the time. They had with them 3000 men, but the castle boasted 5000 in its garrison. Asano's men left the castle to meet the Western forces in what came to be known as the 'battle of Kashii.' Hanawa and Okabe were killed, and Ono was forced to flee back to Osaka.


Buddhist Place of Worship

Tōshōdai-ji is a Buddhist temple of the Ritsu sect in the city of Nara, in Nara Prefecture, Japan. The Classic Golden Hall, also known as the kondō, has a single story, hipped tiled roof with a seven bay wide facade. It is considered the archetype of "classical style." It was founded by a Chinese Buddhist monk named Jianzhen during the Nara period in the year 759. Jianzhen was hired by the newly empowered clans to travel in search of funding from private aristocrats as well. Tōshōdai-ji is one of the places in Nara that UNESCO has designated as World Heritage Site "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara". '== Building list == ⁕Golden Hall - National Treasure of Japan. It was built at the Nara period. ⁕Korō - National Treasure of Japan. It was rebuilt in 1240. ⁕Kōdō - National Treasure of Japan. It was built at the Nara period. ⁕Hōzō - National Treasure of Japan. It was built at the Nara period. ⁕Kyōzō - National Treasure of Japan. It was built at the Nara period. ⁕Mieidō - Important Cultural Property. ⁕Raidō - Important Cultural Property. ⁕Shinden - Important Cultural Property.

Midland Square


Midland Square, officially called Toyota-Mainichi Building, is a skyscraper located in the Meieki district of Nakamura-ku, Nagoya, Japan. It opened in early 2007. It is the fifth tallest building in Japan behind Yokohama Landmark Tower, Rinku Gate Tower Building, Osaka World Trade Center Building and Midtown Tower. Midland Square houses offices of many companies including Toyota Motor Corporation, Towa Real Estate and Mainichi Shimbun. At 247m, it is slightly taller than the nearby JR Central Towers. Midland Square features a shopping center with 60 name-brand stores, two automobile showrooms and a cinema. It also holds the record for the highest open-air observation deck in Japan. Also of note are the unusual double-floored elevators, which take only 40 seconds to rise to the top.



The Yūshūkan is a Japanese military and war museum located within Yasukuni Shrine in Chiyoda, Tokyo. As a museum maintained by the shrine, which is dedicated to the souls of soldiers who died fighting on behalf of the Emperor of Japan, the museum contains various artifacts and documents concerning Japanese war casualties and military activity from the start of the Meiji Restoration to the end of the Pacific War. The museum was established in 1882, and describes itself as the first and oldest war and military museum in Japan. The museum has been accused of containing revisionism in its accounts of Japan's actions in World War II, as well as glorifying Japan's aggressive militaristic past.