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Top tourist attractions in Ireland

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Ireland. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Ireland section.

Curious if any of these place from Ireland made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Ireland and other countries on our tourist attractions map.

Belfast Zoo

Zoo

Belfast Zoological Gardens is a zoo in Belfast, Northern Ireland. It is located in a relatively secluded location on the northeastern slope of Cavehill, overlooking Belfast's Antrim Road, resulting in a uniquely tranquil environment for the animals that the zoo is frequently praised for.

Waterfront Hall

Building

The Waterfront Hall is a multi-purpose facility, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, designed by local architects' firm Robinson McIlwaine. Practice partner Peter McGukin was the project architect. The hall is located in Lanyon Place, the flagship development of the Laganside Corporation. The development is named after the architect Charles Lanyon. Planning for the building began 1989, with the hall being completed in 1997 for the sum of £32 million. The main circular Auditorium seats 2,241 and is based on the Berlin Philharmonic Hall designed by Hans Scharoun. However the flexible design of the Auditorium allows the stalls seating to be moved to create a larger arena. The smaller adjoining Studio seats 380. The dome of the building is coated in copper. This is so the exterior will eventually turn green and reflect the dome of Belfast City Hall and other Victorian buildings in the city centre. The building also contains bars and a restaurant. In 2002, the hall was voted the second best conference centre in the world in the Apex Awards. A 2006 socio-economic impact study commissioned by Belfast City Council found that the hall had generated £10 for the city for every £1 spent on operational costs.

Mourne Mountains

Mountain range

The Mourne Mountains MOHRN, also called the Mournes or Mountains of Mourne, are a granite mountain range in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland. It includes the highest mountains in Northern Ireland and the province of Ulster. The highest of these is Slieve Donard at 850 metres. The Mournes is an area of outstanding natural beauty and has been proposed as the first national park in Northern Ireland. The area is partly owned by the National Trust and sees a large number of visitors every year. The name Mourne is derived from the name of a Gaelic clann or sept called the Múghdhorna.

Grand Opera House, Belfast

Venue

The Grand Opera House is a theatre in Belfast, Northern Ireland, designed by the most prolific theatre architect of the period, Frank Matcham. It opened on 23 December 1895. According to The Theatres Trust the "magnificent auditorium is probably the best surviving example in the United Kingdom of the oriental style applied to theatre architecture".

Belfast City Hall

Edwardian Baroque Structure

Belfast City Hall is the civic building of the Belfast City Council. Located in Donegall Square, Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, it faces north and effectively divides the commercial and business areas of the city centre.

River Lagan

River

The River Lagan is a major river in Northern Ireland which runs 40 miles from the Slieve Croob mountain in County Down to Belfast where it enters Belfast Lough, an inlet of the Irish Sea. The River Lagan forms much of the border between County Antrim and County Down in the east of Ulster. It rises as a tiny fast moving stream off the Transmitter road near to the summit of Slieve Croob. From here it continues on its journey to Belfast through Dromara, Donaghcloney and Dromore. On the lower slopes of the mountain it is joined by another branch from Legananny Mountain, just opposite Slieve Croob. At Dromara, about four miles from its source, its height above the sea is 390 ft. As the river continues on its journey to Belfast it turns east to Magheralin into a broad plain between the Antrim plateau and the plateau of Down. The river drains approximately 609 square km of agricultural land and flows over 70 km from the Mourne Mountains to the Stranmillis Weir, from which point on it is estuarine. The catchment consists mainly of enriched agricultural grassland in the upper parts, with a lower section draining urban Belfast and Lisburn. There is one significant tributary, the Ravernet River, and there are several minor tributaries, including the Carryduff River, the River Farset and the Blackstaff River. Water quality is generally fair though there are localised problems and occasional pollution incidents, mainly due to effluents from farms.

Belfast Castle

Scottish baronial style Structure

Belfast Castle is set on the slopes of Cavehill Country Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland in a prominent position 400 feet above sea level. Its location provides unobstructed views of the city of Belfast and Belfast Lough.

Botanic Gardens

Tourist attraction

Botanic Gardens is a public park in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Occupying 28 acres of south Belfast, the gardens are popular with office workers, students and tourists. They are located on Stranmillis Road in Queen's Quarter, with Queen's University nearby. The Ulster Museum is located at the main entrance.

Bangor Cathedral

Building

Bangor Cathedral is an ancient place of Christian worship situated in Bangor, Gwynedd, north-west Wales. It is dedicated to its founder, Saint Deiniol. The site of the present building of Bangor Cathedral has been in use as a place of Christian worship since the 6th century. The cathedral is built on a low-lying and inconspicuous site, possibly so as not to attract the attention of raiders from the sea. Some visitors to Bangor assume that the Gothic style building on the hill is the cathedral, but this is actually part of the University.

Millennium Forum

Venue

The Millennium Forum is a theatre and conference centre in Newmarket Street, Derry, Northern Ireland. It was the first purpose built theatre in Derry and opened in 2001. It has a seating capacity of 1000 and the largest theatre stage in Ireland. It hosts entertainment of all kinds and can also be used as a meeting and conference venue.

Shimna River

River

The Shimna River is a river in County Down, Northern Ireland. It is a spate river that rises on the slopes of Ott Mountain, in the Mourne Mountains, and enters the Irish Sea at Newcastle, on Dundrum Bay. It is acidic and nutrient-poor, as a result of which its most common flora are mosses and liverworts, including the rare Portuguese feather-moss and Holt's mouse-tail moss. Its principle fish are salmon and sea trout, and it is managed by the Shimna Angling Club. The river is an Area of Special Scientific Interest. The Shimna has a history of flooding; the most serious recent flooding was in 2008. There have also been incidents of pollution, and there were serious fish kills in 2004, 2006 and 2009.