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Federal Republic of Germany Europe Berlin 80,996,685 inhabitants 357,022 sq km 226.87 inhabitants/sq km euros (EUR) population evolution

Top tourist attractions in Germany

Here is a list of top tourist attractions in Germany. Only the topmost tourist destinations are presented here. To see other destinations, please check the images from Germany section.

Curious if any of these place from Germany made it our best tourist attractions in the world list? Read the aformentioned article in order to find out.

You can also view all tourist attractions in Germany and other countries on our tourist attractions map.


Amusement Park

The Nürburgring is a motorsports complex around the village of Nürburg, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. It is located about 70 km south of Cologne, and 120 km northwest of Frankfurt. It features a Grand Prix race track built in 1984, and a much longer old "North loop" track which was built in the 1920s around the village and medieval castle of Nürburg in the Eifel mountains. The north loop is 12.8 miles long and has more than 300 metres of elevation change from its lowest to highest points. Jackie Stewart nicknamed the old track "The Green Hell," and it is widely considered to be the most demanding and difficult purpose-built racing circuit in the world. Originally, the track featured four configurations: the 28.265 km-long Gesamtstrecke, which in turn consisted of the 22.810 km Nordschleife, and the 7.747 km Südschleife. There also was a 2.281 km warm-up loop called Zielschleife or Betonschleife, around the pit area. Between 1982 and 1983 the start/finish area was demolished to create a new GP-Strecke, and this is used for all major and international racing events. However, the shortened Nordschleife is still in use for racing, testing and public access.


Defunct Organisation

Staatliches Bauhaus, commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a school in Germany that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicized and taught. It operated from 1919 to 1933. At that time the German term Bauhaus, literally "house of construction", stood for "School of Building". The Bauhaus school was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar. In spite of its name, and the fact that its founder was an architect, the Bauhaus did not have an architecture department during the first years of its existence. Nonetheless it was founded with the idea of creating a "total" work of art in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together. The Bauhaus style became one of the most influential currents in Modernist architecture and modern design. The Bauhaus had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography. The school existed in three German cities: Weimar from 1919 to 1925, Dessau from 1925 to 1932 and Berlin from 1932 to 1933), under three different architect-directors: Walter Gropius from 1919 to 1928, Hannes Meyer from 1928 to 1930 and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe from 1930 until 1933, when the school was closed by its own leadership under pressure from the Nazi regime. The Nazi government claimed that it was a centre of communist intellectualism. Though the school was closed, the staff continued to spread its idealistic precepts as they left Germany and emigrated all over the world.

Berlin Wall

Film subject

The Berlin Wall was a barrier constructed by the German Democratic Republic starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany. In practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period. The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart" by GDR authorities, implying that neighbouring West Germany had not been fully de-Nazified. The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame"—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border, which demarcated the border between East and West Germany, it came to symbolize the "Iron Curtain" that separated Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War.

Neuschwanstein Castle

Romanesque Revival Structure

Neuschwanstein Castle is a nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival palace on a rugged hill above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest Bavaria, Germany. The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner. Ludwig paid for the palace out of his personal fortune and by means of extensive borrowing, rather than Bavarian public funds. The palace was intended as a personal refuge for the reclusive king, but it was opened to the paying public immediately after his death in 1886. Since then more than 60 million people have visited Neuschwanstein Castle. More than 1.3 million people visit annually, with as many as 6,000 per day in the summer. The palace has appeared prominently in several movies and was the inspiration for Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle and later, similar structures.

Olympic Stadium

Olympic venue

The Olympiastadion is a sports stadium in Berlin, Germany. There have been two stadia on the site: the present facility, and one that is called the Deutsches Stadion which was built for the aborted 1916 Summer Olympics. Both were designed by members of the same family, the first by Otto March and the second by his son Werner March. It is the second biggest stadium in Germany behind Signal Iduna Park. It has been the home stadium of the Hertha Berlin football team since 1963. The current Olympiastadion was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics in the southern part of the Reichssportfeld. During World War II, the area suffered little damage. After the war, the British military occupation used the northern part of the Reichssportfeld as its headquarters until 1949. From 1951 to 2005, the Olympischer Platz had a giant antenna transmitting for all the portable radios in Berlin. Aside from its use as an Olympic stadium, the Olympiastadion has a strong footballing tradition. It was used for 3 matches in the 1974 FIFA World Cup. It hosted six matches, including the final, in the 2006 FIFA World Cup and was renovated for that reason. The German Cup final match is held each year at the Olympiastadion. The stadium sees use in other sports as well; at one point it held the world record for the attendance of a baseball game, thought to be over 110,000. In May 2013, UEFA announced that the Olympiastadion Berlin will host the 2015 UEFA Champions League Final.

Allianz Arena

Sports Facility

The Allianz Arena is a football stadium in the north of Munich, Bavaria, Germany. The two professional Munich football clubs FC Bayern Munich and TSV 1860 München have played their home games at the Allianz Arena since the start of the 2005–06 season. The clubs had previously played their home games at the Munich Olympic Stadium since 1972. The Allianz Arena is the third biggest stadium in Germany behind Signal Iduna Park in Dortmund and the Olympiastadion in Berlin. TSV 1860 München previously had a 50% share in the stadium but FC Bayern Munich bought their shares out for 11 million euros in April, 2006. This still allows TSV 1860 München to play at the stadium but they own no rights to it. The large financial services provider Allianz purchased the rights to name the stadium for 30 years. However this name cannot be used when hosting FIFA and UEFA events, since these governing bodies have policies forbidding corporate sponsorship from companies that are not official tournament partners. During the 2006 World Cup, the stadium was referred to as FIFA World Cup Stadium Munich. In UEFA club matches, it is known as Fußball Arena München, and it hosted the 2012 UEFA Champions League Final. The stadium has been nicknamed "Schlauchboot". The museum of Bayern Munich, FC Bayern Erlebniswelt, is located inside the Allianz Arena.


Amusement Park

Europa-Park is the largest theme park in Germany and the second most popular theme park resort in Europe, following Disneyland Paris. Europa-Park is located in Rust, in south-western Germany, between Freiburg and Strasbourg, France. The park is home to eleven roller coasters, the oldest being the Alpenexpress Mine Train, where a powered coaster speeds through a diamond mine, – and the newest coaster being Wodan, a wooden rollercoaster. Europa-Park has very high capacity rollercoasters and attractions meaning the park can accommodate up to approx. 50,000 guests per day. It counted 4.5 million visitors in 2011, generating an estimated total revenue of EUR 300 million p.a.

Brandenburg Gate

Greek Revival Structure

The Brandenburg Gate is a former city gate, rebuilt in the late 18th century as a neoclassical triumphal arch, and now one of the most well-known landmarks of Germany. It is located in the western part of the city centre of Berlin, at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstraße, immediately west of the Pariser Platz. One block to the north stands the Reichstag building. The gate is the monumental entry to Unter den Linden, the renowned boulevard of linden trees, which formerly led directly to the city palace of the Prussian monarchs. It was commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia as a sign of peace and built by Carl Gotthard Langhans from 1788 to 1791. Having suffered considerable damage in World War II, the Brandenburg Gate was fully restored from 2000 to 2002 by the Stiftung Denkmalschutz Berlin. During the post-war Partition of Germany, the gate was isolated and inaccessible immediately next to the Berlin Wall, and the area around the gate featured most prominently in the media coverage of the opening of the wall in 1989. Throughout its existence, the Brandenburg Gate was often a site for major historical events and is today considered a symbol of the tumultuous history of Europe and Germany, but also of European unity and peace.

Reichstag building

Tourist attraction

The Reichstag building is a historical edifice in Berlin, Germany, constructed to house the Imperial Diet, of the German Empire. It was opened in 1894 and housed the Diet until 1933, when it was severely damaged in a fire. After World War II, the building fell into disuse; the parliament of the German Democratic Republic met in the Palast der Republik in East Berlin, while the parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany met in the Bundeshaus in Bonn. The ruined building was made safe against the elements and partially refurbished in the 1960s, but no attempt at full restoration was made until after German reunification on 3 October 1990, when it underwent a reconstruction led by architect Norman Foster. After its completion in 1999, it once again became the meeting place of the German parliament: the modern Bundestag. The term Reichstag, when used to connote a diet, dates back to the Holy Roman Empire. The building was built for the Diet of the German Empire, which was succeeded by the Reichstag of the Weimar Republic. The latter would become the Reichstag of Nazi Germany, which left the building after the 1933 fire and never returned; the term Reichstag has not been used by German parliaments since World War II. In today's usage, the German word Reichstag refers mainly to the building, while Bundestag refers to the institution.

Cologne Cathedral

Gothic Structure

Cologne Cathedral is a Roman Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne and the administration of the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is a renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and is a World Heritage Site. It is Germany's most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. Construction of Cologne Cathedral commenced in 1248 and was halted in 1473, leaving it unfinished. Work restarted in the 19th century and was completed, to the original plan, in 1880. It is 144.5 metres long, 86.5 m wide and its towers are approximately 157 m tall. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires and largest façade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio, 3.6:1, of any medieval church. Cologne's medieval builders had planned a grand structure to house the reliquary of the Three Kings and fit its role as a place of worship for the Holy Roman Emperor. Despite having been left incomplete during the medieval period, Cologne Cathedral eventually became unified as "a masterpiece of exceptional intrinsic value" and "a powerful testimony to the strength and persistence of Christian belief in medieval and modern Europe".

Berlin Zoological Garden


The Berlin Zoological Garden is the oldest and best known zoo in Germany. Opened in 1844 it covers 34 hectares and is located in Berlin's Tiergarten. With almost 1,500 different species and around 19,500 animals the zoo presents the most comprehensive collection of species in the world. The zoo and its aquarium had almost 3 million visitors in 2012. It is considered to be the most visited zoo in Europe and one of the most popular worldwide. Regular animal feedings are among its most famous attractions. Globally known animals like Knut, the polar bear, and Bao Bao, the Giant Panda have contributed to the zoo's public image. The zoo collaborates with many universities, research institutes, and other zoos around the world. It maintains and promotes European breeding programmes, helps safeguard several endangered species, and participates in several species reintroduction programs.

Olympic Stadium Munich

Olympic venue

Olympiastadion is a stadium located in Munich, Germany. Situated at the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the stadium was built as the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. With an original capacity of 80,000, the stadium also hosted many major football matches including the 1974 World Cup Final and the Euro '88 Final. It hosted the European Cup Finals of 1979, 1993 and 1997. Today, the Olympiastadion holds 69,250. Until the construction of the Allianz Arena for the 2006 World Cup, the stadium was home to Bayern Munich and TSV 1860 Munich.

Deutsches Museum

Aerospace Museum

The Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany, is the world's largest museum of science and technology, with approximately 1.5 million visitors per year and about 28,000 exhibited objects from 50 fields of science and technology. The museum was founded on June 28, 1903, at a meeting of the Association of German Engineers as an initiative of Oskar von Miller. Its official name is Deutsches Museum von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik. It is the largest museum in Munich.

Fernsehturm Berlin

Tourist attraction

The Fernsehturm is a television tower in the city centre of Berlin, Germany. Close to Alexanderplatz, the tower was constructed between 1965 and 1969 by the administration of the German Democratic Republic. It was intended as a symbol of Berlin, which it remains today, as it is easily visible throughout the central and some suburban districts of Berlin. With its height of 368 meters, it is the tallest structure in Germany.

Potsdamer Platz

Tourist attraction

Potsdamer Platz is an important public square and traffic intersection in the centre of Berlin, Germany, lying about 1 km south of the Brandenburg Gate and the Reichstag, and close to the southeast corner of the Tiergarten park. It is named after the city of Potsdam, some 25 km to the south west, and marks the point where the old road from Potsdam passed through the city wall of Berlin at the Potsdam Gate. After developing within the space of little over a century from an intersection of rural thoroughfares into the most bustling traffic intersection in Europe, it was totally laid waste during World War II and then left desolate during the Cold War era when the Berlin Wall bisected its former location. Since German reunification, Potsdamer Platz has been the site of major redevelopment projects.

Semperoper, Dresden

Baroque Structure

The Semperoper is the opera house of the Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden and the concert hall of the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden. It is also home to the Semperoper ballet. The building is located near the Elbe River in the historic centre of Dresden, Germany. The opera house was originally built by the architect Gottfried Semper in 1841. After a devastating fire in 1869, the opera house was rebuilt, partly again by Semper, and completed in 1878. The opera house has a long history of premieres, including major works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.

The Walhalla

Neoclassical Structure

The Walhalla is a hall of fame that honors laudable and distinguished people, famous personalities in German history – politicians, sovereigns, scientists and artists of the German tongue". The hall is housed in a neo-classical building above the Danube River, east of Regensburg, in Bavaria, Germany. The Walhalla is named for Valhalla of Norse mythology. It was conceived in 1807 by Crown Prince Ludwig, who built it upon ascending the throne of Bavaria as King Ludwig I. Construction took place between 1830 and 1842, under the supervision of architect Leo von Klenze. The memorial displays some 65 plaques and 130 busts of persons, covering 2,000 years of history – the earliest person honored is Arminius, victor at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

Bavarian State Opera

Opera Company

The Bavarian State Opera is an opera company based in Munich, Germany. Its orchestra is the Bavarian State Orchestra.

Pergamon Museum

Art Gallery

The Pergamon Museum is situated on the Museum Island in Berlin. The site was designed by Alfred Messel and Ludwig Hoffmann and was constructed in twenty years, from 1910 to 1930. The Pergamon houses original-sized, reconstructed monumental buildings such as the Pergamon Altar and the Market Gate of Miletus, all consisting of parts transported from Turkey. There is controversy over the legitimacy of the acquisition of the collection. The museum is subdivided into the antiquity collection, the Middle East museum, and the museum of Islamic art. The museum is visited by approximately 1,135,000 people every year, making it the most visited art museum in Germany.

Movie Park Germany

Amusement Park

The Movie Park Germany is a theme park with real movie studios in Bottrop-Kirchhellen. It consists of 6 areas based on the topic "fascination film".


Amusement Park

Phantasialand is a theme park in Brühl, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany that attracts approximately 1.75 million visitors annually. The park was opened in 1967 by Gottlieb Löffelhardt and Richard Schmidt. Although starting as a family-oriented park, Phantasialand has also added thrill rides, especially during recent years. Furthermore, following the example of Europa-Park, they have decided to attract business customers beside the regular ones, calling it "Business der neuen Dimension". Among the park's thrill rides is a themed Mine Train roller coaster called Colorado Adventure, which runs among some mountains in the park's Wild West section and was opened by Michael Jackson.

Nymphenburg Palace

Baroque Structure

The Nymphenburg Palace, i.e. "Nymph's Castle", is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, southern Germany. The palace was the main summer residence of the rulers of Bavaria.

Checkpoint Charlie

Tourist attraction

Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War. GDR leader Walter Ulbricht agitated and maneuvered to get the Soviet Union's permission for the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 to stop Eastern Bloc emigration westward through the Soviet border system, preventing escape across the city sector border from East Berlin to West Berlin. Checkpoint Charlie became a symbol of the Cold War, representing the separation of east and west. Soviet and American tanks briefly faced each other at the location during the Berlin Crisis of 1961. After the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc and the reunification of Germany, the building at Checkpoint Charlie became a tourist attraction. It is now located in the Allied Museum in the Dahlem neighborhood of Berlin.



Mittelbau-Dora was a subcamp of Buchenwald concentration camp in Nazi Germany. Its prisoners were used by the SS mainly in the tunnel excavation and nearby underground stations of the Mittelwerk Ltd., in Kohnstein, situated near Nordhausen, where the V-2 rocket and the flying bomb V-1 rocket were produced. During 18 months about 60,000 prisoners from 21 nations passed through Dora. An estimated 20,000 inmates died; 9000 died from exhaustion and collapse, 350 hanged, the remainder died mainly from disease and starvation. The subcamps of Konzentrationslager Mittelbau eventually totalled more than 40.


Gothic Structure

The Wartburg is a castle situated on a 1230-foot precipice to the southwest of, and overlooking the town of Eisenach, in the state of Thuringia, Germany. In 1999 UNESCO added Wartburg Castle to the World Heritage List as an "Outstanding Monument of the Feudal Period in Central Europe", citing its "Cultural Values of Universal Significance".

Tropical Islands Resort

Amusement Park

Tropical Islands Resort is a tropical theme park in Krausnick, in the district of Dahme-Spreewald in Brandenburg, Germany. It is located in the former CargoLifter airship hangar, the biggest free-standing hall in the world. The hall belonged to the company CargoLifter until its insolvency in 2002. Tropical Islands has a maximum capacity of 6,000 visitors a day. In its first year of operation it attracted 975,000 visitors, according to figures published by the operators. The annual report of the Tanjong company states that the hall had 155,000 visitors in the business year February 2004 to February 2005, in other words mainly prior to the opening of the theme park. Approximately 500 people work at Tropical Islands.

Alte Pinakothek

Art Gallery

The Alte Pinakothek is an art museum situated in the Kunstareal in Munich, Germany. It is one of the oldest galleries in the world and houses one of the most famous collections of Old Master paintings. The name alludes to the time period covered by the art — the Neue Pinakothek covers 19th-century art and the recently opened Pinakothek der Moderne exhibits modern art, all galleries are part of Munich's "Kunstareal". The museum is part of the Bavarian State Picture Collection, an organization of the Free state of Bavaria.

Charlottenburg Palace

Rococo Structure

Charlottenburg Palace is the largest palace in Berlin, Germany, and the only surviving royal residence in the city dating back to the time of the Hohenzollern family. It is located in the Charlottenburg district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf borough. The palace was built at the end of the 17th century and was greatly expanded during the 18th century. It includes much exotic internal decoration in baroque and rococo styles. A large formal garden surrounded by woodland was added behind the palace, including a belvedere, a mausoleum, a theatre and a pavilion. During the Second World War, the palace was badly damaged but has since been reconstructed. The palace with its gardens are a major tourist attraction.

Dresden Frauenkirche

Tourist attraction

The Dresden Frauenkirche is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony. Although the original church was Roman Catholic until it became Protestant during the Reformation, the current Baroque building was purposely built Protestant. It is considered an outstanding example of Protestant sacred architecture, featuring one of the largest domes in Europe. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the bombing of Dresden during World War II. The remaining ruins were left as a war memorial, following decisions of local East German leaders. The church was rebuilt after the reunification of Germany. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004 and its interior in 2005. The church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. It now also serves as symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies. Once a month, an Anglican Evensong is held in English, by clergy from the St. George's Anglican Chaplaincy.

Museum für Naturkunde


The Museum für Naturkunde, occasionally called the Naturkundemuseum or Humboldt Museum for short, is a natural history museum in Berlin, Germany. The museum houses more than 30 million zoological, paleontological, and mineralogical specimens, including more than ten thousand type specimens. It is famous for two spectacular exhibits: the largest mounted dinosaur in the world, and an exquisitely preserved specimen of the earliest known bird, Archaeopteryx. Established in 1810, it is the largest museum of natural history in Germany. The museum's mineral collections date back to the Prussian Academy of 1700. Important historic zoological specimens include those recovered by the German deep-sea Valdiva expedition, the German Southpolar Expedition, and the German Sunda Expedition. Expeditions to fossil beds in Tendaguru in former Deutsch Ostafrika unearthed rich paleontological treasures. The collections are so extensive that less than 1 in 5000 specimens is exhibited, and they attract researchers from around the world.

Berlin Cathedral

Neoclassical Structure

Berlin Cathedral is the colloquial name for the Evangelical Oberpfarr- und Domkirche in Berlin, Germany. It is the parish church of the Evangelical congregation Gemeinde der Oberpfarr- und Domkirche zu Berlin, a member of the umbrella organisation Evangelical Church of Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Upper Lusatia. Its present building is located on Museum Island in the Mitte borough. The Berlin Cathedral has never been a cathedral in the actual sense of that term since it has never been the seat of a bishop. The bishop of the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg is based in St. Mary's Church, Berlin, and Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. St. Hedwig's Cathedral serves as seat of Berlin's Roman Catholic metropolitan bishop.

Heidelberg Castle

Gothic Structure

Heidelberg Castle is a famous ruin in Germany and landmark of Heidelberg. The castle ruins are among the most important Renaissance structures north of the Alps. The castle has only been partially rebuilt since its demolition in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is located 80 metres up the northern part of the Königstuhl hillside, and thereby dominates the view of the old downtown. It is served by an intermediate station on the Heidelberger Bergbahn funicular railway that runs from Heidelberg's Kornmarkt to the summit of the Königstuhl. The earliest castle structure was built before AD 1214 and later expanded into 2 castles circa 1294; however, in 1537, a lightning-bolt destroyed the upper castle. The present structures had been expanded by 1650, before damage by later wars and fires. In 1764, another lightning-bolt destroyed some rebuilt sections.


Tourist attraction

The Reeperbahn is a street in Hamburg's St. Pauli district, one of the two centres of Hamburg's nightlife and also the city's red-light district. In German it is also sometimes described as die sündigste Meile.

Kaufhaus des Westens

Tourist attraction

The Kaufhaus des Westens, usually abbreviated to KaDeWe, is a department store in Berlin. With over 60,000 square metres of selling space and more than 380,000 articles available, it is the second-largest department store in Europe; trumped only by Harrods in London. It attracts 40,000 to 50,000 visitors every day. The store is located on Tauentzienstraße, a major shopping street, between Wittenbergplatz and Breitscheidplatz, near the center of the former West Berlin. It is technically in the extreme northwest of the neighbourhood of Schöneberg.

Miniatur Wunderland

Tourist attraction

Miniatur Wunderland is a model railway attraction in Hamburg, Germany and the largest of its kind in the world, built by the twins Gerrit and Frederik Braun. As of January 2011, the railway consists of 12,000 metres of track in HO scale, divided into seven sections: Harz, the fictitious city of Knuffingen, the Alps and Austria, Hamburg, America, Scandinavia, and Switzerland. Of the 6,400 square metres of floorspace, the model takes 1,150 m². By 2020, the exhibit is expected to have reached its final construction phase, including at least a total of ten new sections in a model area of over 2,300 m². The next section covering an airport opened in May 2011. The exhibit includes 890 trains made up of over 11,000 carriages, 300,000 lights, 215,000 trees, and 200,000 human figurines. The creators will work on models of Italy and France now that the airport section is completed. The airport is named Knuffingen International Airport and is modeled after Hamburg International Airport. Possible future additions include Africa, England, or a futuristic landscape.

Stuttgart Central Station

Transit Stop

Stuttgart Hauptbahnhof is a railway station in the city of Stuttgart, the capital of the Land of Baden-Württemberg, in southwestern Germany. It is the largest regional and long-distance railway station in Stuttgart, the main node of the Stuttgart S-Bahn network, and, together with the halt at Charlottenplatz, the main node of the Stuttgart Stadtbahn. Located at the northeastern end of the Königstraße, the main pedestrian zone of the city centre, the main line station is a terminus, whilst the subterranean S-Bahn and Stadtbahn stations are through stations. The station is well known for its 12-storey tower with a large, rotating and illuminated Mercedes-Benz star insignia on top; the tower and station building are city landmarks. Plans for the controversial Stuttgart 21 project to convert the main line terminus station into an underground through station include the demolition of the side wings of the building, together with the elimination of the platforms, tracks, and apron of the terminus station. The planned underground through station is configured at a 90 degree angle to the present station. Construction is scheduled from 2010 to 2019. In November 2009, preservationists of the International Council on Monuments and Sites nominated the building for inclusion in UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list, an occasion that opponents of the Stuttgart 21 project picked to urge the city and Deutsche Bahn to stop the project which implies demolition of parts of the complex designed by Paul Bonatz.

SAP Arena

Sports Facility

SAP Arena is a multi-purpose arena in Mannheim, Germany. It is primarily used for ice hockey and handball, and is the home arena of the Adler Mannheim ice hockey club and the "Rhein-Neckar-Löwen" handball club. Inaugurated in 2005, the arena has a capacity of up to 15,000 people. More than a hundred concerts and congressional events are hosted at the arena annually. The SAP Arena is one of the largest in Germany and one of the most high-tech in Europe. The arena is named after its sponsor SAP. A tram line connects the SAP Arena to Mannheim city center and a newly built road connection to the B 38a highway connects it to the A 656 Autobahn, leading to the A656/A 6 interchange, connecting eastbound Mannheim to Heidelberg, and north/southbound to Frankfurt, Karlsruhe and Stuttgart, as well as a little north on the A6 to Kaiserlautern.

Kunsthalle Hamburg

Art Gallery

The Hamburger Kunsthalle is an art museum in Hamburg, Germany. The art museum focuses on painting in Hamburg in the 14th century, paintings by Dutch and Flemish artists of the 16th and 17th centuries, French and German paintings of the 19th century, modern, and contemporary art. It consists of three connected buildings located in the city center, near the Central Station and the Binnenalster lake.

Tierpark Hagenbeck


The Tierpark Hagenbeck is a zoo in Stellingen, now a quarter in Hamburg, Germany. The collection began in 1863 with animals that belonged to Carl Hagenbeck Sr., a fishmonger who became an amateur animal collector. The park itself was founded by Carl Hagenbeck Jr. in 1907. It is known for being the first zoo to use open enclosures surrounded by moats, rather than barred cages, to better approximate animals' natural environments.

Jewish Museum Berlin

Jewish Museum

The Jewish Museum Berlin is one of the largest Jewish Museums in Europe. In two buildings, one of which is a new addition specifically built for the museum by architect Daniel Libeskind, two millennia of German Jewish history are on display in the permanent exhibition as well as in various changing exhibitions. German-Jewish history is documented in the collections, the library and the archive, in the computer terminals at the museum's Rafael Roth Learning Center, and is reflected in the museum's program of events. The museum opened to the public in 2001. Princeton economist W. Michael Blumenthal, who was born in Oranienburg near Berlin and was later President Jimmy Carter’s Secretary of the Treasury, has been the director of the museum since December 1997.

Hansa Park

Amusement Park

Hansa-Park is a seasonal amusement park in Sierksdorf off the Baltic Sea. It was opened on May 15, 1977 under the name Hansaland and renamed Hansa-Park in 1987. It currently spans 113 acres and includes more than 125 attractions. From 1973 to 1976, the site was home to the first German Legoland. The park is owned by the Leicht family and managed by Christoph Andreas Leicht. The park attracts more than a million visitors each year, making it the fifth largest German amusement park. Stern magazine, in collaboration with the BAT Freizeit-Forschungsinstitut tested the ten leading German amusement parks. Hansa-Park scored second place behind Europa-Park overall and first place in the north. The "Family Park on the Sea" was the first German amusement park to receive the "OK for Kids" seal of approval from the Deutschen Kinderschutzbund and TÜV Nord for the whole park. The grounds are divided into eleven different themed areas, including Alter Jahrmarkt, Westernstadt, Mexiko, Piratenland and Abenteuerland. Each of these areas contains rides and shows consistent with its theme. The park's special charm lies in its careful and detailed use of theming, with many little gags positioned along the way to the large attractions.

Linderhof Palace

Rococo Structure

Linderhof Palace is in Germany, in southwest Bavaria near Ettal Abbey. It is the smallest of the three palaces built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria and the only one which he lived to see completed.

Englischer Garten

Tourist attraction

The Englischer Garten, German for "English Garden", is a large public park in the centre of Munich, Bavaria, stretching from the city centre to the northeastern city limits. It was created in 1789 by Sir Benjamin Thompson, later Count Rumford and extended and improved by his successors, Reinhard von Werneck and Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell, who had advised on the project from the beginning. With an area of 3.7 km², the Englischer Garten is one of the world's largest urban public parks, larger than New York's Central Park. The name refers to the style of gardening; the term English garden is used outside the English-speaking world to refer to the style of informal landscape gardening which was popular in Britain from the mid-18th century to the early 19th century, and is particularly associated with Capability Brown.

Museum Ludwig

Art Gallery

Museum Ludwig, located in Cologne, Germany, houses a collection of modern art. It includes works from Pop Art, Abstract and Surrealism, and has one of the largest Picasso collections in Europe. It also features many works by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. Since November 2012, Philipp Kaiser is director of the museum.

Holiday Park, Germany

Amusement Park

Holiday Park is an amusement park in Haßloch, Germany. It is one of Germany's most popular theme parks and is part park and part woodland. Its Free Fall Tower was the first amusement ride of its kind in Europe. The Park also offers several roller coasters, including Expedition GeForce, a waterpark, and live shows.

Serengeti Park

Amusement Park

The Serengeti Park in Hodenhagen, Lower Saxony, is a zoo and leisure park in North Germany.


Art Gallery

The Lenbachhaus in Munich contains an art museum and is part of Munich's "Kunstareal".

Neue Pinakothek


The Neue Pinakothek is an art museum in Munich, Germany. Its focus is European Art of the 18th and 19th century and is one of the most important museums of art of the nineteenth century in the world. Together with the Alte Pinakothek and the Pinakothek der Moderne it is part of Munich's "Kunstareal".

Deutsches Historisches Museum


The German Historical Museum, DHM for short, is a museum in Berlin devoted to German history and defines itself as a place of enlightenment and understanding of the shared history of Germans and Europeans. The museum is located in the Zeughaus on the avenue Unter den Linden as well as in the adjacent Exhibition Hall designed by I. M. Pei. The German Historical Museum is under the legal form of a foundation registered by the Federal Republic of Germany. Its highest-ranking body is the Board of Trustees with representatives of the Federal Government, the German Bundestag and the governments of the German Länder, or states.

Middle Rhine

Body Of Water

Between Bingen and Bonn, Germany, the Rhine River flows as the Middle Rhine through the Rhine Gorge, a formation created by erosion, which happened at about the same rate as an uplift in the region, leaving the river at about its original level, and the surrounding lands raised. This gorge is quite deep, about 130 meters from the top of the rocks down to the average water-line. The "Middle Rhine" is one of four sections of the river between Lake Constance and the North Sea. The upper half of the Middle Rhine from Bingen to Koblenz is a UNESCO World Heritage Site with more than 40 castles and fortresses from the Middle Ages and many wine-villages. The lower half from Koblenz to Bonn is famous for the formerly volcanic Siebengebirge with the Drachenfels volcano. Both parts together are known as "the romantic Rhine". The Middle Rhine Valley has been a major tourist attraction since the 19th century. It is also home to some 450,000 people. The valley owes its special appearance to both its natural shape and human alterations. For two millennia, it has been one of the most important routes for cultural exchange between the Mediterranean region and northern Europe. Situated in the heart of Europe, it was sometimes a border and sometimes a bridge between different cultures. The history of the valley reflects the history of Western Europe. With its many outstanding monuments, its hills full of vines, its settlements crowded on the narrow river banks, and the rows of castles lined up on the hill tops, it is considered the epitome of the Rhine romanticism. It inspired Heinrich Heine to write his famous poem "Lorelei" and Richard Wagner to write his opera Götterdämmerung.

Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

Art Gallery

The Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden, Germany, displays around 750 paintings from the 15th to the 18th centuries. It includes major Italian Renaissance works as well as Dutch and Flemish paintings. Outstanding works by German, French and Spanish painters of the period are also among the gallery's attractions. The Old Masters are part of the Dresden State Art Collections. The collection is located in the Semper Gallery, the gallery wing of the Zwinger.



Wilhelma, built as a royal palace, is now a 30-hectare zoo and botanical garden in the northern suburbs of Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is Europe's only large combined zoological and botanical garden, and is home to over 8,000 animals representing more than 1,000 different species, as well as more than 5,000 species of plants. The upper section of the zoo includes an impressive stand of sequoia trees. The zoo immediately adjoins a public park to its west, laid out in the 'English landscape style' of rolling grass and informal groups of trees. In landscape terms this perfectly complements the landscape of the zoo.



The Autostadt is a visitor attraction adjacent to the Volkswagen factory in Wolfsburg, Germany, with a prime focus on automobiles. It features a museum, feature pavilions for the principal automobile brands in the Volkswagen Group, a customer centre where customers can pick up new cars, and take a tour through the enormous factory, a guide to the evolution of roads, and cinema in a large sphere. It is also home to the largest glass doors in the world and the longest printed line. The line starts from outside Wolfsburg and travels through Autostadt to a point on a farm. It is about 4 miles long.

Frankfurt Zoological Garden


The Frankfurt Zoological Garden is the zoo of Frankfurt, Germany. It features over 4,500 animals of more than 450 species on more than 13 hectares. The zoo was founded in 1858 and is the second oldest Zoo in Germany. It lies in the eastern part of the Innenstadt. Bernhard Grzimek was director of the zoo after World War II from 1945 until 1974. The Frankfurt Zoological Society was founded in 1858 by citizens of Frankfurt to establish the Zoological Garden, which it operated until the First World War. The city council then assumed responsibility for the zoo until 1950, when the FZS again became the zoo's development association.

Gemäldegalerie, Berlin

Art Gallery

The Gemäldegalerie is an art museum in Berlin, Germany, and the museum where the main selection of paintings belonging to the Berlin State Museums is displayed. It holds one of the world's leading collections of European paintings from the 13th to the 18th centuries. Its collection includes masterpieces from such artists as Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach, Hans Holbein, Rogier van der Weyden, Jan van Eyck, Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt and Johannes Vermeer. It was first opened in 1830, and the current building was completed in 1998. It is located in the Kulturforum museum district west of Potsdamer Platz.

Mainz Cathedral

Romanesque Structure

Mainz Cathedral or St. Martin's Cathedral is located near the historical center and pedestrianized market square of the city of Mainz, Germany. This 1000 year-old Roman Catholic cathedral is the site of the episcopal see of the Bishop of Mainz. Mainz Cathedral is predominantly Romanesque in style, but later exterior additions over many centuries have resulted in the appearance of various architectural influences seen today. It comprises three naves and stands under the patronage of Saint Martin of Tours. The eastern quire is dedicated to Saint Stephen. The interior of the cathedral houses tombs and funerary monuments of former powerful Electoral-prince-archbishops, or Kurfürst-Erzbischöfe, of the diocese and contains religious works of art spanning a millennium. The cathedral also has a central courtyard and statues of Saint Boniface and The Madonna on its grounds.

Hellabrunn Zoo


Hellabrunn Zoo is a 36-hectare zoological garden in the Bavarian capital of Munich. The zoo is situated on the right bank of the river Isar, in the southern part of Munich near the quarter of Thalkirchen. As the groundwater level here is rather high and the water is of very good quality, the zoo can cover its needs for freshwater by using its own wells. A high ratio of enclosures are cageless, relying upon moat features to keep the animals in place. The zoo was the first zoo in the world not organized by species, but also by geographical aspects. For example the wood bisons share their enclosure with prairie dogs. In some places, the zoo has food dispensers where, for a small cost, the correct food for the species may be thrown by the public. This reduces the risk of animals being fed inappropriate foodstuffs. In 2013, the zoo was ranked 4th best zoo in Europe. It focuses on conservation and captive breeding rare species such as the rare drill and silvery gibbon monkeys. Also gorillas, giraffes, elephants, wood bisons, elk and arctic foxes were successfully bred in the zoo, which houses a large number of species. Tierpark Hellabrunn is a member of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria and the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums and participates in the European Endangered Species Programme.

Naturmuseum Senckenberg


The Naturmuseum Senckenberg in Frankfurt am Main is the second largest museum of natural history in Germany. It is particularly popular with children, who enjoy the extensive collection of dinosaur skeletons: Senckenberg boasts the largest exhibition of large dinosaurs in Europe. One particular treasure is a dinosaur fossil with unique, preserved scaled skin. The museum contains the world's largest and most diverse collection of stuffed birds with about 2000 specimens. In 2010, almost 517,000 people visited the museum. The building housing the Senckenberg Museum was erected between 1904 and 1907 outside of the center of Frankfurt in the same area as the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, which was founded in 1914. The museum is owned and operated by the Senckenberg Nature Research Society, which began with an endowment by Johann Christian Senckenberg. Today, visitors are greeted outside the building by large, life-size recreations of dinosaurs, which are based on the latest scientific theories on dinosaur appearance. Inside, one can follow the tracks of a Titanosaurus, which have been impressed into the floor, towards its impressive skeleton on a sheltered patio. Attractions include a Parasaurolophus with its crest, a fossilized Psittacosaurus with clear bristles around its tail and visible fossilized stomach contents, and an Oviraptor. Big public attractions also include the Tyrannosaurus rex, an original of an Iguanodon, and the museum's mascot, the Triceratops.

Alte Nationalgalerie

Art Museum

The Alte Nationalgalerie in Berlin is a gallery showing a collection of Neoclassical, Romantic, Biedermeier, Impressionist and early Modernist artwork, part of the Berlin National Gallery, which in turn is part of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. It is the original building of the National Gallery, whose holdings are now housed in several additional buildings. It is situated on Museum Island, a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site.

Bode Museum


The Bode Museum is one of the groups of museums on the Museum Island in Berlin, Germany; it is a historically preserved building. The museum was designed by architect Ernst von Ihne and completed in 1904. Originally called the Kaiser-Friedrich-Museum after Emperor Frederick III, the museum was renamed in honour of its first curator, Wilhelm von Bode, in 1956.

Altes Museum


The Altes Museum is one of several internationally renowned museums on Museum Island in Berlin, Germany. Since restoration work in 1966, it houses the Antikensammlung of the Berlin State Museums. The museum was built between 1823 and 1830 by the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel in the neoclassical style to house the Prussian royal family's art collection. The historic, protected building counts among the most distinguished in neoclassicism and is a high point of Schinkel's career. Until 1845, it was called the Königliches Museum. Along with the other museums and historic buildings on Museum Island, the Altes Museum was designated an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999.

Technikmuseum Speyer

Aerospace Museum

The Technik Museum Speyer is a technology museum in Speyer, Germany.

Pinakothek der Moderne


The Pinakothek der Moderne is a modern art museum, situated in the city centre of Munich, Germany. Together with its two predecessors Alte Pinakothek and Neue Pinakothek, as well as the Museum Brandhorst, the Antikensammlungen, the Glyptothek, the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus and the new joint building of the Ägyptisches Museum and the Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film, currently both scheduled to open in 2012, it is part of Munich's "Kunstareal".

Eltz Castle

Romanesque Structure

Burg Eltz is a medieval castle nestled in the hills above the Moselle River between Koblenz and Trier, Germany. It is still owned by a branch of the same family that lived there in the 12th century, 33 generations ago. The Rübenach and Rodendorf families' homes in the castle are open to the public, while the Kempenich branch of the family uses the other third of the castle. The Palace of Bürresheim, the Castle of Eltz and the Castle of Lissingen are the only castles on the left bank of the Rhine in Rhineland-Palatinate which have never been destroyed.

Hohenschwangau Castle

Tourist attraction

Hohenschwangau Castle or Schloss Hohenschwangau is a 19th-century palace in southern Germany. It was the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria and was built by his father, King Maximilian II of Bavaria. It is located in the German village of Hohenschwangau near the town of Füssen, part of the county of Ostallgäu in southwestern Bavaria, Germany, very close to the border with Austria.

Munich Residenz

Neoclassicism Structure

The Munich Residenz is the former royal palace of the Bavarian monarchs in the centre of the city of Munich, Germany. The Residenz is the largest city palace in Germany and is today open to visitors for its architecture, room decorations, and displays from the former royal collections. The complex of buildings contains ten courtyards and displays 130 rooms. The three main parts are the Königsbau, the Alte Residenz and the Festsaalbau. A wing of the Festsaalbau contains the Cuvilliés Theatre since the reconstruction of the Residenz after World War II. It also houses the Herkulessaal, the primary concert venue for the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. The Byzantine Court Church of All Saints at the east side is facing the Marstall, the building for the former Court Riding School and the royal stables.

Frauenkirche, Munich

Gothic Structure

The Frauenkirche is a church in the Bavarian city of Munich that serves as the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising and seat of its Archbishop. It is a landmark and is considered a symbol of the Bavarian capital city. The church towers are widely visible because of local height limits. According to the narrow outcome of a local plebiscite, city administration prohibits buildings with a height exceeding 99 m in the city center. Since November 2004, this prohibition has been provisionally extended outward and as a result, no buildings may be built in the city over the aforementioned height. The south tower is open to those wishing to climb the stairs and offers a unique view of Munich and the nearby Alps.

Sinsheim Auto & Technik Museum

Aerospace Museum

The Auto & Technik Museum Sinsheim is a technology museum in Sinsheim, Germany. Opened in 1981, it is run by a registered association called "Auto & Technik Museum Sinsheim e.V." which also runs the Technik Museum Speyer.

German Museum of Technology

Aerospace Museum

Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin was founded in 1982 in Berlin, Germany, and exhibits a large collection of historical technical artifacts. The museum's main emphasis is on rail transport, but it also features exhibits of various sorts of industrial technology. Recently, it has opened both maritime and aviation exhibition halls. The museum also contains a science center called Spectrum. On May 15, 2002, a special exhibition opened which featured the inventions of computer pioneer Konrad Zuse, including a reproduction of the Z1. It is located in the Kreuzberg district of Berlin, in buildings formerly part of the freight depot attached to the Anhalter Bahnhof. The building's famous C-47 'Raisinbomber' Skytrain can be seen with ease from the top of the Fernsehturm and from a descending aircraft landing at Tempelhof Airport. The museum contains many relics throughout, including an enormous railway collection, a large aircraft section which houses a Messerschmitt Bf 110, Flak cannon, the last Focke-Wulf Fw 200 and a V-1 flying bomb. The Cessna that Mathias Rust flew to Moscow during the cold war has also been added to the exhibition.

Gottorf Castle


Gottorf Castle is a castle and estate in the city of Schleswig, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It is the ancestral home of the Holstein-Gottorp branch of the House of Oldenburg. It is situated on an island in the Schlei, about 40 km from the Baltic Sea.

Duisburg Zoo


The Duisburg Zoo, founded on May 12, 1934, is one of the largest zoological gardens in Germany. It is especially well known for its dolphinarium and, since 1994, for breeding koalas. Far less well known are the breeding successes in other areas, for example, with fossas and Red River hogs. The zoo is located in the northern part of the Duisburg urban forest on the border with Mülheim on the Ruhr. Federal highway A 3 divides the zoo into western and an eastern parts, which are joined by a leafy country bridge. The highway is scarcely noticeable to the visitors.

Schwerin Castle

Tourist attraction

Schwerin Castle is a palace located in the city of Schwerin, the capital of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern state, Germany. It is situated on an island in the city's main lake, the Schweriner See. For centuries the palace was the home of the dukes and grand dukes of Mecklenburg and later Mecklenburg-Schwerin. It currently serves as the seat of the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern state parliament. It is regarded as one of the most important works of romantic Historicism in Europe. For this rank, it is also nicknamed "Neuschwanstein of the North".

Haus der Kunst


The Haus der Kunst is a non-collecting art museum in Munich, Germany. It is located at Prinzregentenstrasse 1 at the southern edge of the Englischer Garten, Munich's largest park.

Vitra Design Museum

Deconstructivism Structure

The Vitra Design Museum is an internationally renowned, privately owned museum for design in Weil am Rhein, Germany. Vitra CEO Rolf Fehlbaum founded the museum in 1989 as an independent private foundation. The Vitra corporation provides it with a financial subsidy, the use of Vitra architecture, and organizational cooperation.

Erlebnispark Tripsdrill

Amusement Park

Erlebnispark Tripsdrill is a wildlife and theme park near Cleebronn in Southern Germany. Covering 77 hectares in total, the park offers over 100 attractions, including museums, animal petting and feeding, roller coasters, playgrounds, and a theatre. Opened in 1929, it is Germany's oldest amusement park and is still owned and managed by the same family.


Neoclassicism Structure

The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures. It was designed by Leo von Klenze in the Neoclassical style, and built from 1816 to 1830. Today the museum is a part of the Kunstareal.

Weltvogelpark Walsrode


Weltvogelpark Walsrode is a bird park located in the middle of the Lüneburg Heath in North Germany within the municipality of Bomlitz near Walsrode in the state of Lower Saxony, Germany. Weltvogelpark Walsrode is the largest bird park in the world in terms of species as well as land area, It covers 24 hectares and houses some 4,200 birds of over 675 species from every continent and climatic zone in the world. The Weltvogelpark Walsrode celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 2012.

Hanover Zoo


Hanover Zoo is located in the city centre of Hanover, Germany. The zoo was established on May 4, 1865, and comprises an area of 22 hectares. Currently, it is home to about 3,414 animals in 237 species, which are cared for by more than 400 employees in the summer season.

Ludwigsburg Palace

Baroque Structure

Ludwigsburg Palace is a historical building in the city of Ludwigsburg, Germany. It is one of the country's largest Baroque palaces and features an enormous garden in that style. From the 18th century to 1918 it was the principal royal palace of the dukedom that became in 1806 the Kingdom of Württemberg.

Leipzig Zoological Garden


The Leipzig Zoological Garden, or the Leipzig Zoo, was opened in Leipzig, Germany on June 9, 1878. It was taken over by the city of Leipzig in 1920 after World War I and now covers about 225,000 square metres and contains approximately 850 different species. The zoo is internationally noted for its spectacular building projects and its large carnivore exhibit. It has bred more than 2,000 lions, 250 rare Siberian tigers, and other carnivores like bears.

German Tank Museum


The German Tank Museum is an armoured fighting vehicle museum in Munster, Germany, the location of the Munster Training Area camp. Its main aim is the documentation of the history of German armoured troops since 1917. It originated in 1983 from the instructional collection of the Panzertruppenschule, the Bundeswehr school for training officers and NCO's of German armoured units. It is now a museum open to the public, jointly run by the municipality of Munster and the Panzertruppenschule. The museum site covers an area of over 9,000 square metres. including 7,500 square metres of exhibition halls. In 2003 the museum opened a new building for special displays, a museum shop and a cafeteria.

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church

Romanesque Revival Structure

The Protestant Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is located in Berlin on the Kurfürstendamm in the centre of the Breitscheidplatz. The original church on the site was built in the 1890s. It was badly damaged in a bombing raid in 1943. The present building, which consists of a church with an attached foyer and a separate belfry with an attached chapel, was built between 1959 and 1963. The damaged spire of the old church has been retained and its ground floor has been made into a memorial hall.

Legoland Deutschland

Amusement Park

Legoland Deutschland is a Legoland park located in Günzburg in southern Germany, roughly half way from Munich to Stuttgart, which opened in 2003. It is 43.5 hectares in area, and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Bavaria. The Miniland contains Lego reproductions of various German cities and rural landscapes. It is one of Germany's most popular attractions with millions of visitors each year.

Topography of Terror

Jewish Museum

The Topography of Terror is an outdoor and indoor museum in Berlin, Germany. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era. The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished. Indeed the section adjacent to the Topography of Terror site is the longest extant segment of the outer wall. The first exhibitions of the site took place in 1987, as part of Berlin's 750th anniversary. The cellar of the Gestapo headquarters, where many political prisoners were tortured and executed, were found and excavated. The site was then turned into a memorial and museum, in the open air but protected from the elements by a canopy, detailing the history of repression under the Nazis. The excavation took place in cooperation with East German researchers, and a joint exhibition was shown both at the site and in East Germany in 1989.



kestnergesellschaft is an art gallery in Hanover, Germany, founded in 1916 to promote the arts. Its founders included the painter Wilhelm von Debschitz. The association blossomed under the management of Alexander Dorner and Justus Bier, pioneering modern art. After World War II, Alfred Hentzen took over the management in 1947, followed by Fritz Schmalenbach. In 1997 the kestnergesellschaft moved into new premises at Goseriede 11, the former site of the Goseriede baths. The new gallery is next to the Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung, Hanover's newspaper. The gallery hit the headlines in 2005 when it exhibited a mud house created by Spanish artist Santiago Sierra featuring a room with mud floor reminiscent of Hanover's lake Maschsee. The gallery's current director is Veit Goerner.

Hofbräuhaus am Platzl

Tourist attraction

The Hofbräuhaus am Platzl is a beer hall in the city center of Munich, Germany. The inn was originally built in 1598 by Bavarian Duke Maximilian I. It was built as an extension of the original Hofbräu brewery, but for Weissbier. The general public was admitted only in 1828 by then king Ludwig I. The building was completely remodeled in 1897 by Max Littmann, when the brewery moved to the suburbs. In the bombing of WW II, everything but the ground floor was destroyed; it took until 1958 to be rebuilt. The restaurant comprises most of the mentioned inn, a ballroom as well as a beer garden. Its menu features Bavarian dishes such as roast pork, pork knuckle, and sausages such as Weisswurst. Helles is served in a Maß, along with wheat beer and wine. Though sometimes regarded as being "commercialized", it is popular among locals as well as foreigners. During regular hours, traditional Bavarian music is played. The Hofbräuhaus song, composed in 1935 by Wilhelm 'Wiga' Gabriel, goes: "In München steht ein Hofbräuhaus, oans, zwoa, g'suffa!". The beer is provided by the brewery Staatliches Hofbräuhaus.

Olympiapark, Munich

Tourist attraction

The Olympiapark in Munich, Germany, is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. Found in the area of Munich known as the "Oberwiesenfeld", the Park continues to serve as a venue for cultural, social, and religious events such as events of worship. The Park is administered by Olympiapark München GmbH, a holding company fully owned by the state capital of Munich.

Germanisches Nationalmuseum


The Germanisches Nationalmuseum is a museum in Nuremberg, Germany. Founded in 1852, it houses a large collection of items relating to German culture and art extending from prehistoric times through to the present day. With current holdings of about 1.2 million objects, the Germanisches Nationalmuseum is Germany's largest museum of cultural history. Formerly the Germanisches Museum, it was founded by a group of individuals led by the Franconian baron, Hans von und zu Aufsess, whose goal was to assemble a "well-ordered compendium of all available source material for German history, literature and art". The buildings incorporate the remaining structures of the former Nuremberg Charterhouse, dissolved in 1525 and used for a variety of secular purposes until in 1857 what was left of the premises, by then badly dilapidated, was given to the Museum.

Cologne Zoological Garden


The Aktiengesellschaft Cologne Zoological Garden is the zoo of Cologne, Germany. It features over 7,000 animals of more than 700 species on more than 20 hectares. The internationally renowned zoo with an attached aquarium and invertebrate exhibit has an emphasis on primates such as bonobos and lemurs, and is active in preservational breeding of animals that are in danger of becoming extinct. In addition, in-the-wild conservation efforts and research focussing on animals of Madagascar, Wallacea, and Vietnam are actively promoted and supported via cooperation with Cologne University and local projects, such as in the case of Przewalski's Horses. The zoo was founded in 1860. The world wars led to a phase of stagnation, and the zoo had to close for two years entirely, after virtually being destroyed in World War II. It reopened in 1947; the aquarium was added in 1971. In 1985, the large primate house, one of the main attractions, was opened. Today, the zoo also features a free-flight rainforest hall with free-ranging birds and reptiles opened in 2000, and as the latest addition a large elephant park.


Tourist attraction

The Königsallee is an urban boulevard in Düsseldorf, state capital of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The Königsallee is noted for both the landscaped canal that runs along its center, as well as for the fashion showrooms and luxury retail stores located along its sides. Nicknamed Kö by the locals, the Königsallee is by far Germany's busiest, upscale shopping street.

Egyptian Museum of Berlin


The Egyptian Museum of Berlin is home to one of the world's most important collections of Ancient Egyptian artifacts. The collection is part of the Neues Museum.

Kunsthalle Bremen

Art Gallery

The Kunsthalle Bremen is an art museum in Bremen, Germany. It is located close to the Bremen Old Town on the "Culture Mile". The Kunsthalle was built in 1849, enlarged in 1902 by architect Eduard Gildemeister, and expanded several more times, most notably in 2011. Since 1977, the building has been designated a Kulturdenkmal on Germany's buildings heritage list. The museum houses a collection of European paintings from the 14th century to the present day, sculptures from the 16th to 21st centuries and a New Media collection. Among its highlights are French and German paintings from the 19th and 20th century, including important works by Claude Monet, Édouard Manet and Paul Cézanne, along with major paintings by Lovis Corinth, Max Liebermann, Max Beckmann and Paula Modersohn-Becker. The New Media section features works by John Cage, Otto Piene, Peter Campus, Olafur Eliasson, and Nam June Paik. The Department of Prints and Drawings has 220,000 sheets from the 15th to 20th centuries, one of largest collections of its kind in Europe. The Kunsthalle Bremen is operated by the non-profit Bremen Art Society, making it the only German museum with an extensive art collection from the 14th to 21st centuries which is still in private ownership.

Wallraf-Richartz Museum

Art Gallery

The Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud is one of the three major museums in Cologne, Germany. It houses an art gallery with a collection of fine art from the medieval period to the early twentieth century.



The Städel, officially the Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie, is an art museum in Frankfurt am Main, with one of the most important collections in Germany. The Städel owns 2,700 paintings and a collection of 100,000 drawings and prints as well as 600 sculptures. It has around 4,000 m² of display and a library of 100,000 books and 400 periodicals.


Sports Facility

Olympiahalle is a multi-purpose arena in Munich, Germany, part of the Olympic Park and close to the Olympic Stadium.

Coface Arena

Sports Facility

Coface Arena is a multi-purpose stadium in Mainz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany that was opened in 2011. It is used for football matches and hosts the home matches of the German Bundesliga side Mainz 05. The stadium has a capacity of 34,034 people, of which 19,700 seated, and replaces the Bruchweg stadium, Stadion am Bruchweg. The architecture of the new stadium resembles the design of traditional English football stadiums with their high stands.


Tourist attraction

The Luisenpark is a municipal park in Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, whose attractions include a greenhouse, "gondoletta" boats and a variety of facilities for children. Along with the Herzogenriedpark it is operated by the non-profit Stadtpark Mannheim gGmbH.

Fernsehturm Stuttgart

Tourist attraction

Fernsehturm Stuttgart is a 216.61 m telecommunications tower in Stuttgart, Germany. It is the world's first of its kind constructed from concrete, and it is the prototype for many such towers world-wide. The tower is located on Hoher Bopser Hill in the southern Stuttgart district of Degerloch.


Tourist attraction

Marienplatz is a central square in the city centre of Munich, Germany. It has been the city's main square since 1158.

Wuppertal Zoo


Wuppertal Zoo is a 24-hectare zoo in Wuppertal, Germany. About 5,000 animals representing about 500 species from around the world live at the zoo, including apes, monkeys, bears, big cats and elephants, as well as birds, reptiles and fish.